Able to Admonish One Another #1973

Now I myself am confident concerning you, my brethren, that you also are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge, able also to admonish one another.” (Romans 15:14, NKJV)

The merciful inclusion of the Gentiles in the blessings God had promised the Hebrew fathers evokes the joyful praise of God (Rom. 15:7-12). He is the “God of hope” for Gentiles and Jews, filling us with hope regardless of our race (Rom. 15:13). Their hope in Christ gave Paul confidence the Roman Christians would serve one another’s spiritual needs (instead of pleasing themselves, Rom. 15:1-6). Paul identified two things that gave them power (“able” is the verb form of “power” in Rom. 1:16) to admonish one another effectively. To admonish means to “put to mind,” “to caution or reprove,” to warn (Strong, G3560). First, they were able to admonish because they were “full of goodness.” Warnings and reproof are more palatable and productive when they come from a heart of goodness. Admonitions that do not spring from a place of virtue can easily take on the flavor of self-righteous judging instead of caring concern for the sinner’s soul. Secondly, they had the power to admonish because they were “filled with all knowledge.” God’s truth, not our “think so’s,” must inform and guide us when we caution and warn one another. Combining goodness and knowledge equips us to serve each other with needful warnings and exhortations as we live in the joy, peace, and hope of God (Rom. 15:13).

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