All posts by swordtips

Gospel preacher with the Mt. Baker church of Christ, Bellingham, Washington since 1996.

Jesus Ate With Sinners #1408

1 Then all the tax collectors and the sinners drew near to Him to hear Him. 2 And the Pharisees and scribes complained, saying, “This Man receives sinners and eats with them.” (Luke 15:1–2, NKJV)

Yes, Jesus ate with sinners (including Pharisees, Luke 7:36-50). On this occasion, the Pharisees and scribes charged Jesus with giving credence to sin by being with sinners. With a contemporary twist on this worn out accusation, people today say that since “Jesus ate with sinners” we should have no problem doing so. They fail to see why the tax collectors and sinners drew close to Jesus. They came to listen to the teaching of Jesus (verse 1)! It is not uncommon for worldly people to try to draw Christians into compromising situations by saying, “Jesus ate with sinners – why won’t you?” When you offer Christ’s teachings as your topic of conversation with them, they refuse. Why? Because that is not what they want. They are not like the sinners with whom Jesus ate. Instead, they want you to accept them in their sin (or at least, they want you to say nothing about it to them). If you agree to such a silent, social interchange you weaken your godly influence and give the worldly person an opportunity to claim your approval, merely because you ate with them. When Jesus ate with sinners He talked with them about their souls, repentance and salvation (Lk. 15:3-7). That should be our topic of conversation with sinners, too.

Advertisements

Give No Offense #1407

31 Therefore, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God. 32 Give no offense, either to the Jews or to the Greeks or to the church of God, 33 just as I also please all men in all things, not seeking my own profit, but the profit of many, that they may be saved. (1 Corinthians 10:31–33, NKJV)

The apostle Paul refused to contribute to someone else’s sin. The word “offense” in verse 32 means “not led into sin” – Paul would not lead someone into sin. He would forego his own personal liberty so that his influence would not lead any one to violate their weak conscience (1 Corinthians 10:27-31). Christians should not say, “Since I have the liberty (right) to do something, I will do it regardless of what your conscience lets you do.” Such an attitude may embolden the one with a weak conscience toward the liberty to violate itself, which would be sin (Romans 14:23).  One’s use of a personal liberty must not be more important than glorifying God and saving a soul. We sin against Christ when we press a personal liberty to the point of causing someone to the sin against their weak conscience (1 Corinthians 8:10-12). Do you forego liberties in order to save souls, or do you seek your own personal benefit first? Surely this is one way we deny ourselves in order to follow Jesus (Luke 9:23).

The Religious Regulations of Men #1406

20 Therefore, if you died with Christ from the basic principles of the world, why, as though living in the world, do you subject yourselves to regulations— 21 “Do not touch, do not taste, do not handle,” 22 which all concern things which perish with the using—according to the commandments and doctrines of men?” (Colossians 2:20–22, NKJV)

Christian live for Christ and not according to the principles of the world that oppose Christ. Since we are alive in Christ we must not turn back to those things that produce spiritual death (Colossians 2:12-13). The futility and sinfulness of the commands and doctrines of men is firmly established in today’s verse. Yet, century after century heavier and heavier burdens have been laid on believers, demanding that creeds, confessions or catechisms be followed to define and determine their faithfulness to God. The religious regulations of men have no standing before the God of the Universe. Christ the King has approved no doctrine beyond what is written in His New Testament (1 Corinthians 4:6; Jude 3; 2 John 9). The gospel calls souls back to the Bible, not to being regulated by the commandments and doctrines of men. If what you believe and do cannot be found in the gospel of Christ, it is not of Christ. Lay all such things aside or you will perish with them.

Will You Repent? #1405

20 For I fear lest, when I come, I shall not find you such as I wish, and that I shall be found by you such as you do not wish; lest there be contentions, jealousies, outbursts of wrath, selfish ambitions, backbitings, whisperings, conceits, tumults; 21 lest, when I come again, my God will humble me among you, and I shall mourn for many who have sinned before and have not repented of the uncleanness, fornication, and lewdness which they have practiced. (2 Corinthians 12:20–21, NKJV)

Paul wished to come to the Corinthians bringing edification instead of a sharp rebuke (2 Corinthians 12:15, 19, 13:7-10). For this to occur some would need to repent of sins they had not yet corrected. The list of transgressions in verse 20 is reflective of hearts that were not yet open to God’s will. Their sins would provoke sorrow within Paul when he arrived if not corrected by repentance. Repentance produces a change in one’s practice. Christians are called on to examine our hearts (our values, motives, thoughts, etc.) and our conduct carefully to repent and bear its godly fruit. Otherwise, we contribute to our own spiritual demise and hinder others. Use today to reflect on whether you would bring the apostle sorrow or joy should he visit you. If sorrow, then repent. If joy, then continue to do good.

Forgiving and Being Forgiven #1404

And forgive us our sins, for we also forgive everyone who is indebted to us. And do not lead us into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one. (Luke 11:4, NKJV)

Would you be forgiven of your sins if God forgave you the way you forgive others? Do you ask God to forgive you because you forgive everyone who sins against you? That is how Jesus said to pray to our heavenly Father about our forgiveness (see Matthew 6:12). God considers whether or not we forgive others when we ask Him to forgive us. Therefore, we need to examine our forgiveness of others. Forgiving those who sin against us is an action of faith which is necessary to be forgiven by the Father (Matthew 6:14; Luke 17:4-5). It is futile to expect God to forgive us when we will not forgive others. Jesus said, “But if you do not forgive men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses” (Matthew 6:15). The devil tempts us not to forgive others. He entices us to withhold from others the very things we need from God – mercy, compassion and forgiveness. We will lose our souls if we give in to his temptation. We are delivered from the temptation to withhold forgiveness by our own need for God’s forgiveness. Remember, it is the merciful who obtain mercy (Matthew 5:7).

Enemies of the Cross of Christ #1403

18 For many walk, of whom I have told you often, and now tell you even weeping, that they are the enemies of the cross of Christ: 19 whose end is destruction, whose god is their belly, and whose glory is in their shame—who set their mind on earthly things. (Philippians 3:18–19, NKJV)

Paul affirms what Jesus also taught. Many will walk in a way they think leads to heaven, but which in fact leads to destruction. Jesus said, “Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father in heaven” (Matthew 7:21). Not doing the Father’s will is undoubtedly the “broad way” He warns us of in Matthew 7:13. The broad way is where we find the enemies of the cross of Christ. We must be diligent not to be counted among that number! To avoid being an enemy of Christ we must (1) Do the will of the Father by following the word of Christ and the apostolic examples (John 12:48; Philippians 3:17), (2) Serve the desires of God and not the desires of the flesh (Romans 8:5-8), and (3) Set our minds on heavenly things (Colossians 3:2). When we follow the commands of Christ we are His friends (John 15:14). If we do not, we are His enemies. There is no third option.

Fight the Good Fight of Faith #1402

Fight the good fight of faith, lay hold on eternal life, to which you were also called and have confessed the good confession in the presence of many witnesses. (1 Timothy 6:12, NKJV)

June 6, 1944. D-Day was the largest amphibious attack in history. It was a battle for the liberation of Europe and the defeat of tyrannical, dictatorial, murderous oppression. About 156,000 Allied soldiers attacked the German forces on the Normandy beaches of France that day. In less than a week, the beaches were secure, with over 4,000 Allied troops dead and many thousands more wounded. The horror of that battle is tempered only by the victory it would help secure. In less than a year Nazi Germany unconditionally surrendered to the Allied Forces. Christians, we are at war against a spiritual army of wickedness (Ephesians 6:12). The aim of this vile army is the eternal demise of you and every other soul. We must fight more valiantly, endure more bravely and trust more fervently than those brave soldiers did on D-Day. Ours is a battle for eternity. Our victory is assured in Christ as we put on His armor and stand against the devil (1 John 5:4; Ephesians 6:10-17). Onward, Christian soldiers! God has called you this battle and you have confessed your allegiance to Him. Now, fight and lay hold on eternal life!