Tag Archives: death

“For dust you are, and to dust you shall return” #1254

In the sweat of your face you shall eat bread till you return to the ground, for out of it you were taken; For dust you are, and to dust you shall return. (Genesis 3:19, NKJV)

Adam’s mortality would become evident as he labored to eat and to survive on this earth. Eventually, Adam would die (Genesis 5:5). God’s creative purpose was for human beings to forever dwell with Him in the close fellowship of holiness. But, Adam and Eve’s sin separated them from their fellowship with God (Genesis 3:22-23; Isaiah 59:2). And, so it is that our sins separate us from God, too (Romans 3:23; 6:23). Adam’s flesh was created from the dust of the ground (Genesis 2:7). Because of sin’s intrusion into this world, back to the dust Adam’s body (along with those of all his descendants), would return (Ecclesiastes 12:7). But, God also gave Adam a spirit, made in His image, that continues to exist beyond the grave (Genesis 1:27; Ecclesiastes 12:7). God’s plan of redemption in His Son, Jesus Christ, redeems both the body and the spirit (John 11:23-26). The gospel of Christ is the good news of how God defeats sin and death, giving the redeemed eternal access to the tree of life in the garden of God – forever freed from sin and its curse of death (Revelation 22:1-5).

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Thanksgiving #1246

But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ. (1 Corinthians 15:57)

Thanksgiving Day is here, reminding us to always be thankful to God. The greatest blessing of all is our victory over sin and death through the Lord Jesus Christ. Sin has been utterly defeated by the death of Jesus Christ on the cross. Therefore:

1) Be thankful today for God’s grace, by which Jesus died for everyone and brought salvation to all who will believe and obey (Hebrews 2:9; Titus 2:11).

2) Be thankful today that you have received God’s gift of salvation by your obedient faith to Christ (Ephesians 2:8-9; Hebrews 5:8-9; Romans 6:17-18).

Death has been utterly defeated by the resurrection of Christ from the dead. The empty tomb is a constant memorial to the fact that Jesus is the Son of God and that he has complete power over death (Romans 1:4; Revelation 1:18). Therefore:

1) Be thankful today that death is no longer fearful – Jesus replaced the fear of death with confident hope (Hebrews 2:14-15).

2) Be thankful today that death will be your doorway into eternal joy, peace and life (Philippians 1:21).

God gives us no greater blessing than victory over sin and death through Jesus Christ. Thanks be to God!

(Revision of Sword Tips #12)

Turn, and Live #1230

10 Therefore you, O son of man, say to the house of Israel: ‘Thus you say, “If our transgressions and our sins lie upon us, and we pine away in them, how can we then live?” ’ Say to them: ‘As I live,’ says the Lord God, ‘I have no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but that the wicked turn from his way and live. Turn, turn from your evil ways! For why should you die, O house of Israel?’ (Ezekiel 33:10–11, NKJV)

Without doubt, Israel had grievously sinned against the Lord God. From the depths of despair, with their sins bringing ruin to their nation, they wondered how they could survive. Although judgment was being exacted upon the sinful nation, it gave God no pleasure to see its demise. He is not a vindictive God, who delights in the destruction of those who sin against Him. Even when sin has separated sinners far from Him, God yearns for their life, not their death. For that reason, God pleaded with these souls to turn from their evil ways, and live. At this very moment, you may be weighed down by sin. If so, God wants you to have eternal life, not eternal death. Through the gospel of Christ, He calls you to turn away from every sin, and live. Godly sorrow produces repentance, that leads to salvation (2 Corinthians 7:10; Acts 2:37-38). Turn, and live.

Blessedness of Death #1192

1 The righteous perishes, and no man takes it to heart; Merciful men are taken away, while no one considers that the righteous is taken away from evil. 2 He shall enter into peace; They shall rest in their beds, each one walking in his uprightness. (Isaiah 57:1–2, NKJV)

Because Israel’s watchmen were blind and silent, the righteous among them perished. There was no mercy in the land; sin and suffering had taken control of the land. The death of the righteous was a blessing in disguise. By death, the righteous were extracted from the impending calamity of judgment brought on by the nation’s sins. We can get so wrapped up in thinking about life here and now, that we forget the blessing death will bring. For sure, death brings sorrow of loss and separation. But Christians see it as much more. For the righteous, death gives passage away from merciless evil, to a place of rest and comfort (Luke 16:19-25). Let us view death as an exit and an entrance. Death is our exit from a sin-filled world, and our entrance into joyful peace. “Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of His saints” (Psalm 116:15). May we walk in uprightness, and see the blessedness of death’s deliverance from pain, into an abiding rest for the soul.

Caught in the cords of his sin #1186

22 His own iniquities entrap the wicked man, and he is caught in the cords of his sin. 23 He shall die for lack of instruction, and in the greatness of his folly he shall go astray. (Proverbs 5:22–23, NKJV)

The Bible clearly explains the effects and consequences of personal sin. The worldly mind refuses to acknowledge what sin is, and what it does to one’s soul (Romans 1:18-32; 3:9-18; 6:23). Sin is very real, even though the fleshly mind ignores it, and even redefines it to justify its wrongdoing. Sin is a snare from which no one can escape without God’s help. Its bands grow increasingly tight as one ignores God and His truth. Every sinner must listen to and follow the instruction of God to be freed from the bondage of their sin. Jesus said, “And you shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free” (Jno. 8:32). Do not believe the lies of the world the says sin is nothing. To practice sin is exceedingly foolish, and those who choose to go astray in it are not wise. If you are living in sin, you are headed for eternal death, a fiery punishment from which there will be no escape (2 Thessalonians. 1:8-9; Revelation 20:11-15; 21:6-8). Jesus Christ will save you from your sin and death, if you will listen to His word, believe Him and obey Him (read Luke 8:8; John 8:23-24; Acts 17:30; 22:16; Hebrews 5:8-9).

“Upon this Rock I will Build My Church” #1113

And I also say to you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build My church, and the gates of Hades shall not prevail against it. (Matthew 16:18, NKJV)

The rock upon which Jesus built His church is not Peter; it is the confession Peter had just made: “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God” (Matt. 16:16). Without this great truth, there would be no church, no “called out” body of redeemed souls who are purchased by the blood of the Son of God (Acts 20:28; Eph. 1:22-23; 25-27; Rev. 5:9-10). It is an obvious, yet neglected truth, that the church belongs to Christ. The church does not belong to you or me, or any other person. Therefore, no one has the right to alter it, abuse it, disrespect it, discount it or corrupt it with the “commandments and doctrines of men” (Col. 2:22; Matt. 15:7-9). The death of Jesus did not prevent the building of His church. Indeed, His death and resurrection declares His great power over sin and death. The church is the result of Christ’s great victory over sin and death. So, rather than minimizing the church as an afterthought, or as a non-essential, personal choice, let us praise God for the church of Christ and the heavenly blessings Christians have in Christ (Eph. 3:10-11; 1:3). There is only one church, and that is the church we must choose; the church which Christ built. The churches of men are not, and never will be, the church of Christ.

Remember the Death of Jesus #1090

23  For I received from the Lord that which I also delivered to you: that the Lord Jesus on the same night in which He was betrayed took bread; 24  and when He had given thanks, He broke it and said, “Take, eat; this is My body which is broken for you; do this in remembrance of Me.” 25  In the same manner He also took the cup after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in My blood. This do, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of Me.” (1 Corinthians 11:23–25, NKJV)

Does the church of which you are a member eat the Lord’s Supper every first day of the week? In the days of the early church, every first day of the week was “as often as” the disciples ate and drank the supper (Acts 20:7). We should follow the example of the apostles, including Paul, who ate the Lord’s Supper with the Troas church on the first day of the week (Acts 20:7; 1 Cor. 4:16). Why do you eat the Lord’s Supper? Jesus said it is for the express purpose of remembering Him. When Christians eat the bread, we remember His body that was put to death for us. When Christians drink the cup (the fruit of the vine, Lk. 22:18), we remember His blood that dedicated the new covenant. The Lord’s Supper is a solemn memorial of Jesus’ death. We just observed Memorial Day by remembering those who gave their lives for our freedom. How much more then, ought we to honor Jesus by following His teaching with a weekly remembrance of His death, which gives us freedom from sin.