Tag Archives: diligence

Work, for the night is coming #1832

3 Jesus answered, “Neither this man nor his parents sinned, but that the works of God should be revealed in him. 4 I must work the works of Him who sent Me while it is day; the night is coming when no one can work. 5 As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world.” (John 9:3–5, NKJV)

The diligence with which Jesus labored is a model of zeal, endurance, and accomplishment. As He prepared to heal a man who was blind from birth, He explained the principle which drove Him each day. He had been given work to do by His Father (who sent Him to the earth). His time on the earth was limited, and so He diligently went about doing His Father’s work (which was teaching the gospel and showing Himself to be “the light of the world” – the Christ, the Son of God). Just as the Father gave the Son work to do, Christians are “created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them” (Eph. 2:10). With Jesus as our model, let us be zealous to walk in (do, practice) the good works of God each day, by living soberly, righteously, and godly (Tit. 2:11-12). Night is coming for us all, when our time to labor for the Lord will end. So, as long as we have today, let us be diligent children of light who do the Father’s will, and “through faith and patience inherit the promises” (Heb. 6:9-12).

Do Not Love Sleep #1718

Do not love sleep, lest you come to poverty; Open your eyes, and you will be satisfied with bread. (Proverbs 20:13, NKJV)

Sleep is necessary for our minds and bodies to rest, repair and revitalize. As our Creator, it is obvious God knows this and made us this way. Today’s proverb does not warn against sleep, but against loving sleep. While sleep is beneficial, there are things we cannot do when we are asleep. We cannot work and earn a living, we cannot communicate with others, and we cannot be alert to potential dangers. We should view sleep as utilitarian, not utopian. It serves good and helpful purposes, but it is not an end in itself. Jesus said, “I must work the works of Him who sent Me while it is day; the night is coming when no one can work” (John 9:4). He used the time He had to diligently do the Father’s will. Whether it is our daily jobs that provide food and sustenance for ourselves and our families, or our spiritual endeavors to walk in the good works God has prepared for us, we must open our eyes, get up out of bed, and get to work (1 Tim. 5:8; Eph. 2:10). When we do our part, God promises to do His (Matt. 6:25-34). Otherwise, “A little sleep, a little slumber, a little folding of the hands to sleep— So shall your poverty come on you like a prowler, and your need like an armed man” (Prov. 6:10-11).

“Not Lagging in Diligence” #834

not lagging in diligence, fervent in spirit, serving the Lord; (Romans 12:11, NKJV)

Are you eager to live for Christ today? Are you attentive to being true to Him and serving His will? Such eagerness is a defining trait of the faithful Christian. “Lagging in diligence” denotes tardiness and slothfulness. We are to be fervent in our disposition toward the Lord and His cause. Lagging behind in diligence connotes timidity, holding back and hesitation when we ought to confidently do God’s will. We have work to do, and “God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind” by which to accomplish it (2 Tim. 1:7). Zealous faith energizes one’s service to the Lord. Commit yourself to being eagerly attentive to serve the Lord. Spiritual diligence invigorates us to “press toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus” (Phil. 3:14).

Giving All Diligence #611

But also for this very reason, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue, to virtue knowledge, to knowledge self-control, to self-control perseverance, to perseverance godliness, to godliness brotherly kindness, and to brotherly kindness love. (2 Peter 1:5–7, NKJV)

Half-heartedness does not please God. We must love Him with all our heart, soul and mind (Matt. 22:37). It is not surprising, then, that God expects us to give “all diligence” when it comes to spiritual development. We are to approach our spiritual growth with eagerness and swiftness. This demands a mindset or way of thinking that aggressively seizes every opportunity to become stronger in faith. The growth of our faith is not something we say we will “get around to someday”. Do not sit back and wait for growth to just happen, because it will not. Seize the moment, make haste to add to your faith.

Add to Your Faith #610

But also for this very reason, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue, to virtue knowledge, to knowledge self-control, to self-control perseverance, to perseverance godliness, to godliness brotherly kindness, and to brotherly kindness love. (2 Peter 1:5–7, NKJV)

The “very reason” upon which Peter builds his case for spiritual growth is the “great and precious promises” we have been given. Christians have heeded the gospel call to be “partakers of the divine nature” by escaping the corruption of sin that is in the world (2 Pet. 1:4). Our redemption in Christ is no reason to ignore spiritual growth. Indeed, it is the very reason we are to give all diligence to add to our faith qualities of the divine nature: virtue, knowledge, self-control, perseverance, godliness, brotherly kindness and love. As our faith abounds in these traits of a strengthened faith, we become useful and fruitful in knowing Christ, and are given entrance into heaven (2 Pet. 1:8, 10-11). If we choose not to grow in faith, we lose our spiritual sight and forget our cleansing from past sins (2 Pet. 1:9). Thus, it may be said of heaven, if we will not grow, we will not go. Let us “be even more diligent” to make our calling and election sure by increasing our faith in the Lord (2 Pet. 1:10).

Diligent Faith #442

10  For God is not unjust to forget your work and labor of love which you have shown toward His name, in that you have ministered to the saints, and do minister. 11  And we desire that each one of you show the same diligence to the full assurance of hope until the end, 12  that you do not become sluggish, but imitate those who through faith and patience inherit the promises. (Hebrews 6:10–12)

This inspired writer had just warned of those who “fall away” and the spiritual peril posed by hardened hearts that turn away from the gospel (Heb. 6:4-6). Now he urges Christians to remain diligent “until the end”, knowing that our “full assurance of hope” equips us to do so (v. 11). Lazy, apathetic faith must not characterize us, for if it does we too are in spiritual danger. The promises of God are not inherited by a lazy faith, but through faith enlivened by hope. God will not forget your loving service to His people. Keep on serving one another, and by doing so imitate the Master who “did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many” (Matt. 20:28).00:0500