Tag Archives: discretion

Quick-Tempered Quickly A Fool #1674

A quick-tempered man acts foolishly, and a man of wicked intentions is hated. (Proverbs 14:17, NKJV)

Reason and good judgment exit the scene when anger enters the stage. “He who is slow to wrath has great understanding, but he who is impulsive exalts folly (Prov. 14:29). The short fuse of anger and wrath destroys relationships we claim to be valuable to us – family, friendships, brethren. We have chosen foolishness and evil intentions over discretion and peace when we lose control of our emotions and let anger rule our spirit (Jas. 1:19-20). Anger expresses ill will, even hatred, toward others. Getting angry does not remove being accountable for our words and actions. Cain was very angry and hated his brother Abel, leading to murder (Gen. 4:5-7; 1 Jno. 3:12-15). His anger led to great folly. It is not enough to know we should not lose our temper. Knowing this, we must add self-control to our knowledge to help us master our emotions (2 Pet. 1:6). Even when others hurt us we dare not be quick-tempered and play the fool. “The discretion of a man makes him slow to anger, and his glory is to overlook a transgression” (Prov. 19:11).

The Forethought of Wisdom #1375

21 My son, let them not depart from your eyes— Keep sound wisdom and discretion; 22 So they will be life to your soul and grace to your neck. 23 Then you will walk safely in your way, and your foot will not stumble. (Proverbs 3:21–23, NKJV)

A vital component of wisdom is forethought, the ability to look ahead and to arrange one’s actions and reactions accordingly. “Look before you leap” is an everyday way of expressing this basic trait of wisdom. It is not enough to know right and wrong (truth), it is essential that a knowledge of the truth is coupled with prudent discretion. Note the proverb praises “sound wisdom,” because not all wisdom is sound. There is a wisdom that is “earthly, sensual, demonic” (James 3:15). Such wisdom is like a “bull a china cabinet,” wreaking havoc as it thrashes about, destroying in the name of truth. On the other hand, when wisdom is trained using God’s truth, it will use forethought to evaluate the best way to achieve a righteous outcome (James 3:13, 17-18). Properly applied wisdom will “be life to your soul and grace to your neck,” enabling you to live safely. Wisdom anticipates what is likely to happen, and uses discretion to prepare for and to avoid danger while advancing righteousness. It seems that is what Jesus had in mind when He told the twelve, “Behold, I send you out as sheep in the midst of wolves. Therefore be wise as serpents and harmless as doves” (Matthew 10:16).