Tag Archives: Isaiah

Bringing Good News #1503

Behold, on the mountains the feet of him who brings good tidings, who proclaims peace! O Judah, keep your appointed feasts, perform your vows. For the wicked one shall no more pass through you; He is utterly cut off.” (Nahum 1:15, NKJV)

Using language similar to an earlier prophet (Isaiah), Nahum announces the joy of Judah upon hearing the news of Nineveh’s overthrow. He pictures a messenger traversing the mountains to bring good news that the wicked enemy had been defeated and would no longer plague them. As the messenger proclaims peace, Judah is called to worship Jehovah free of the enemy’s oppression. Isaiah used these words to declare the coming of the Messiah (Isaiah 40:9; 52:7). In Romans 1:15 the apostle Paul used this figure to describe preaching the gospel. Like Isaiah and Nahum, the gospel contains both the message of salvation in Jesus Christ and the defeat of our enemies. Like the proclamation of Nineveh’s defeat, the gospel of Christ proclaims peace with God because our enemies, sin and death, are defeated (John 12:31-33). It is by preaching this good news that sinners hear, believe and call on the Lord for salvation (Romans 10:13-15; 1 Corinthians 1:21; Acts 2:36-41). With the oppression of sin removed in Christ, we now serve Him with the joy of salvation (Philippians 4:4-9).

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“Let Us Go Up to the Mountain of the Lord” #1476

Many people shall come and say, “Come, and let us go up to the mountain of the Lord, to the house of the God of Jacob; He will teach us His ways, and we shall walk in His paths.” For out of Zion shall go forth the law, and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem. (Isaiah 2:3, NKJV)

Christians are evangelistic. We urge others to join us in the kingdom of God, to learn His ways and to walk in His paths. The gospel of Christ went into all the world beginning at Jerusalem to proclaim God’s salvation to the world (Luke 24:47; Acts 2:38-41). Have you shared the saving gospel with anyone lately? Have you urged them to come to the kingdom and be blessed by the King? Let us use the Jerusalem gospel to call the lost to salvation. It has the power to give the kingdom blessings of redemption and eternal life to those who are lost in sin (Romans 1:16-17). Come and learn the ways of God. Come and walk in His paths. Find rest for your soul (Matthew 11:28-30).

The Mountain of the Lord’s House #1475

1 The word that Isaiah the son of Amoz saw concerning Judah and Jerusalem. 2 Now it shall come to pass in the latter days that the mountain of the Lord’s house shall be established on the top of the mountains, and shall be exalted above the hills; And all nations shall flow to it.” (Isaiah 2:1–2, NKJV)

Far from being a prophecy that has not yet been fulfilled, Isaiah lifts his eyes beyond the Judah and Jerusalem of his day to see what would transpire in the days beyond his own (Micah 4:1-3). Just as Peter said the “last days” of which Joel spoke were being fulfilled on Pentecost, even so this prophecy looks to the days of the Messiah’s reign and redemption for its fulfillment (Acts 2:16-17; 1 Peter 1:19-21). This grand portrait of the mountain of the Lord’s house rising above the mountain tops depicts the strength and power of the kingdom of God, the church, to which all nations flow (Daniel 2:34-35, 44; Hebrews 12:21-24, 28). It is the gospel of the kingdom that calls the lost to come and live in the presence of the Lord (2 Corinthians 6:16-18). Ancient Judah and Jerusalem fell as punishment for their sins. Isaiah sees heavenly Jerusalem, freed from sin’s bondage and exalted in the heavenly places in Christ (Hebrews 12:22; Ephesians 2:19-22). This kingdom, the church, is superior to all the kingdoms of men. The gospel call rings out, urging you to come and enter the kingdom, redeemed by the blood of the Lamb (Acts 2:36-41; Colossians 1:13-14).

Rebellion is Deceitful #1354

8 Now go, write it before them on a tablet, and note it on a scroll, that it may be for time to come, forever and ever: 9 That this is a rebellious people, lying children, children who will not hear the law of the Lord; 10 Who say to the seers, “Do not see,” and to the prophets, “Do not prophesy to us right things; Speak to us smooth things, prophesy deceits.” (Isaiah 30:8–10, NKJV)

God wanted there to be no doubt as to why Israel would come under the penalty of His judgment and be fragmented as a nation (Isaiah 30:12-14; Jeremiah 30:11). The prophet’s inscription of God’s word has left an indelible explanation that instructs us today. Like the rebellion of lying children who refuse to obey their parents, Israel rebelliously rejected and opposed God’s servants the prophets (Jeremiah 7:23-27). They rebelled at His word and called for smooth teachings instead of the right things of God. They were willing to be deceived by sin and error. Their rebellion was their downfall. Do not argue against the word of God. Do not call for smooth teachings that feel good but deny the truth (God’s word). One who refuses the truth of God is in rebellion against God. That is a most unenviable, most repulsive, place to be. If that is where you are, leave your rebellion and go back to your heavenly Father. He is merciful, and ready to forgive (Luke 15:11-24).

“In vain they worship Me” #1287

6 He answered and said to them, “Well did Isaiah prophesy of you hypocrites, as it is written: ‘This people honors Me with their lips, but their heart is far from Me. 7 And in vain they worship Me, teaching as doctrines the commandments of men.’” (Mark 7:6–7, NKJV)

The hypocrisy of Israel was reaching its zenith in the days of Isaiah (Isaiah 29:13-14). Israel gave Jehovah lip service, while serving idols, and demanding their own teachings be regarded as divine truth. This verse gives us God’s definition of a hypocritical heart: While saying one honors God, he elevates his own will above the will of the Almighty. Hypocrisy is pretense, pretending to be what one is not. The Greek word was applied to the actor who wore a mask, pretending to be a character in a drama. Christ applied this term to the Pharisees and scribes of His day. Their words honored God, but their hearts were given over to the commandments of men. The Jews had codified their oral traditions (the Mishnah). These men whom Jesus rebuked judged a violation of their traditions to be a violation of God’s law (see Mark 7:8-9). We must avoid accepting human traditions as if they are the will of God, lest we join hands with the hypocrites of Christ’s day. Revealed truth, not the traditions of men, must guide our hearts and our deeds. Otherwise, our worship will be vain.

“Before they Call, I will Answer” #777

It shall come to pass that before they call, I will answer; And while they are still speaking, I will hear. (Isaiah 65:24, NKJV)

God is never far from His faithful ones. He has always been “a very present help in trouble” (Psa. 46:1). In today’s verse, Christians have a prophetic reminder that God gives abundant attention to our prayers. God’s ready interest and awareness of His children is one of the spiritual blessings we possess in Christ as citizens of “heavenly Jerusalem” (the church, Eph. 1:3; Heb. 12:22-23). Our Father in heaven is so attentive to our needs that He knows what they are before we ask Him (Matt. 6:8). Rather than this preventing prayer, it heightens our trust that “the eyes of the Lord are on the righteous, and His ears are open to their cry (Psa. 34:15; 1 Pet. 3:12). Our faith rests solidly on His unwavering love and care; we are “anxious for nothing” (Phil. 4:6). The Lord is always near. He already knows your need—better than you do. He promises to answer when you speak to Him. So, come boldly before His throne of grace to “obtain mercy and find grace to help in time of need” (Heb. 4:16).

“Holy, Holy, Holy” #594

In the year that King Uzziah died, I saw the Lord sitting on a throne, high and lifted up, and the train of His robe filled the temple. Above it stood seraphim; each one had six wings: with two he covered his face, with two he covered his feet, and with two he flew. And one cried to another and said: “Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts; The whole earth is full of His glory!” (Isaiah 6:1–3, NKJV)

Isaiah’s vision of the Lord sitting upon His heavenly throne presents a magnificent scene of the Lord Almighty in all His majesty, power, splendor and holiness. Heavenly beings attend Him and praise Him for His holiness, acknowledging His creation magnificently displays His grandeur and brilliance. How very unlike the gods that men have made for themselves throughout the ages. Their false gods rise no higher than the human imagination and vices from which they sprang. In vivid contrast, the earth proclaims the majesty of the Almighty and His holiness. This becomes more dramatic when we learn from the apostle John that Isaiah saw the glory of Jesus; He is the Lord sitting on the throne, lifted up and holy (John 12:37-41). Jesus is worthy of our faithful praise and service, for He is the Lord Almighty.