Tag Archives: Jerusalem

The Answer is Conversion to Christ #2244

34 “O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the one who kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to her! How often I wanted to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, but you were not willing! 35 See! Your house is left to you desolate; and assuredly, I say to you, you shall not see Me until the time comes when you say, ‘Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord’” (Luke 13:34–35, NKJV)!

God wanted to hold Jerusalem close to Himself, sheltered and safe. But she objected. Now, desolation would be left in the wake of their rejection of God’s prophets and the Messiah. Only in the Messiah’s salvation from her sins would she be blessed (v. 35; Ps. 118:26). Our nation faces many problems brought on by sin: Racism, hatred, division, crime, immoralities of all sorts, hypocrisy – the list goes on. Our sins disgrace our nation: “Righteousness exalts a nation, but sin is a reproach to any people” (Prov. 14:34). The answer to our nation’s ills is not political, economic, sociological, psychological, or environmental. The answer is salvation from sin, conversion of hearts and lives to Jesus Christ. His gospel truth changes hearts and lives, replacing injustice with fairness. It overcomes evil. Salvation from our sins is the prosperity we must seek. “Save now, I pray, O Lord; O Lord, I pray, send now prosperity. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord! We have blessed you from the house of the Lord” (Ps. 118:25-26).

Be a Son of Encouragement #2159

26 And when Saul had come to Jerusalem, he tried to join the disciples; but they were all afraid of him, and did not believe that he was a disciple. 27 But Barnabas took him and brought him to the apostles. And he declared to them how he had seen the Lord on the road, and that He had spoken to him, and how he had preached boldly at Damascus in the name of Jesus. 28 So he was with them at Jerusalem, coming in and going out. (Acts 9:26–28, NKJV)

Joseph was named “Barnabas” (son of encouragement) by the apostles for a reason (Acts 4:36). With entreaties and exhortations, he gave solace, comfort, and consolation to fellow Christians. We see this son of encouragement in action in today’s passage. The persecutor Saul was now a Christian, but the Jerusalem disciples only knew of the havoc he had made of the church three years earlier (Acts 8:3; 9:13-16). So, they were fearful when Saul “tried to join the disciples” (v. 26). With complete information in hand, Barnabas vouched for Saul, telling of his encounter with the Lord on the road that led to his conversion and bold gospel preaching in Damascus (Acts 9:17-22; 22:17-21). There are several worthy lessons in our text, but today let us focus on Barnabas. His fearless defense of Saul assured the apostles, comforted the frightened church, and (no doubt) consoled Saul as it led to the brethren receiving him in the Lord (vv. 27-28). Barnabas seized opportunities to stand for the truth, encourage his brethren, and strengthen souls (Acts 4:36-37; 11:22-24). Can you imagine what could have happened if Barnabas had not spoken up for the truth on Saul’s behalf? Be a Barnabas. Seize your opportunities to console, comfort, and encourage the truth, trust, and triumph over fear and doubt.

“He is Coming With Clouds, and Every Eye Will See Him” #2144

Behold, He is coming with clouds, and every eye will see Him, even they who pierced Him. And all the tribes of the earth will mourn because of Him. Even so, Amen. (Revelation 1:7, NKJV)

We may immediately think this verse refers to Christ’s return on the last great day (Acts 1:11). That day will surely come (Acts 17:30-31). But to apply it to the last day overlooks its immediate context and the broader context of the book. Christ gave John this revelation to show to the servants of Christ “things that must shortly take place” because “the time is near” (Rev. 1:1, 3). Jesus Christ is “the ruler over the kings of the earth,” a central truth borne out in The Revelation (17:14; 19:15-16). Yet, Christians were being persecuted unto death (even though Christ had loved them, redeemed them, and made them a kingdom of priests on earth, Rev. 1:5-6). The Revelation assures them He would execute judgment against their persecutors; They would be victorious in Him (Rev. 17-19; 18:20-24; 19:11-21). The expression, “coming with clouds,” is judgment language (as Jesus used in Matt. 24:29-30 of Jerusalem’s demise, cf. Isa. 19:1). He said, “They shall see the Son of Man coming on the clouds of heaven.” There was no visible image of Jesus when Jerusalem fell. But its fall was evidence that the Son of Man rules in heaven and on earth. They would “see” the Son of Man coming in judgment against Jerusalem, which happened in A.D. 70. His heavenly reign and authority were on display for all to see (Mk. 13:26, 30; Matt. 26:64). Similarly, Revelation 1:7 refers to Christ’s judgment against the persecuting powers, the Roman empire (cf. Rev. 14:14-16). “The ruler over the kings of the earth” would soon execute His judgment, and it would be evident (“every eye will see Him”). “Even so, Amen.”

God Has Installed His King #2129

4 He who sits in the heavens shall laugh; The Lord shall hold them in derision. 5 Then He shall speak to them in His wrath, and distress them in His deep displeasure: 6 “Yet I have set My King on My holy hill of Zion.” (Psalm 2:4–6, NKJV)

God’s purposes are not overthrown by the plots and schemes of humans (Psa. 2:1-3). God replies with scornful derision in verse 4 to those who would fight against His Anointed (Christ) and their rule. God responds with wrath and fury (v. 5). He is Lord (Heb., Adonay) over earth’s kings and rulers, and He counters their opposition to His will with an unequivocal declaration in verse 6: He would succeed. 1) “Yet” – They would fail in their resistance to God and His Christ. This verse lands a death blow to the premillennial doctrine that God withdrew His kingdom plans because the Jews rejected Jesus. 2) “I have set My King” – God installed the King of His choosing. God’s Anointed was chosen for His righteousness and crowned king by Almighty God (Jer. 23:5-7; Heb. 1:8-9). After His resurrection, Jesus Christ ascended to His throne at God’s right hand (Psa. 110:1; Dan. 7:13-14; Eph. 1:20-23; Acts 2:32-36). Jesus is king now. 3) “On My holy hill of Zion” – Christ rules over God’s kingdom. Zion is God’s “dwelling place” and “resting place” (Psa. 132:13-14). King David seized the stronghold of Zion (1 Chron. 11:4-7). Now Jesus Christ (the son of David) is enthroned on Mount Zion, the “heavenly Jerusalem” to which we have come and over which Christ reigns (Micah 4:1-4; Heb. 12:22-23). Christ rules “in the midst of His enemies” (Psa. 110:2). Heaven and earth are under His authority (Matt. 28:18).

“Your Work Shall Be Rewarded” #2073

15 Thus says the Lord: “A voice was heard in Ramah, lamentation and bitter weeping, Rachel weeping for her children, refusing to be comforted for her children, because they are no more.” 16 Thus says the Lord: “Refrain your voice from weeping, and your eyes from tears; For your work shall be rewarded, says the Lord, and they shall come back from the land of the enemy. 17 There is hope in your future, says the Lord, that your children shall come back to their own border.” (Jeremiah 31:15–17, NKJV)

The horrors of the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem (586 B.C.) and exile were followed by a remnant of the people returning to their land (Ezra 1-2). God gave hope to the exiled people through Jeremiah, assuring them their “work shall be rewarded” and “your children shall come back to their own border.” It is telling the Lord said their “work” would be rewarded. (See Jeremiah 29:1-11 for a description of their “work” and God’s promised reward.) Many teach any rewarded work of man is meritorious and against the purpose of God. This verse teaches otherwise. So, the “faith only” people have a problem because Jeremiah said God would reward their work. There are Messianic undertones to the passage. Matthew applied verse 15 directly to Herod’s slaughter of the young male children in Bethlehem and its districts (Matt. 2:16-18). Jesus survived that horrific event, and our hope is redemption from sin’s captivity in Christ Jesus (Rom. 5:1-2, 8-11). Works of faith do not merit the reward God promises us any more than the remnant’s faith earned their return to the land. Works of obedience show our faith in God and the hope we have in Jesus (Jas. 2:17-18; Heb. 10:36-11:1). Remember, God rewards the faithful (Heb. 11:6).

The Terror of the Lord #2035

37 O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the one who kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to her! How often I wanted to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, but you were not willing! 38 See! Your house is left to you desolate; 39 for I say to you, you shall see Me no more till you say, ‘Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord!’ (Matthew 23:37–39, NKJV)

God longed to gather His people to Himself to give them refuge and blessings. But their rejection of Christ brought terrible judgment upon Jerusalem and Judea at the hands of the Roman army. Like vultures devouring their prey, the Romans squelched a Jewish rebellion when general Titus destroyed Jerusalem and the temple in A.D. 70 (Matt. 24:1-2). Historian Josephus estimated 1.1 million Jews perished (many who had come to the city for Passover). Tens of thousands were enslaved and dispersed throughout the empire. Jerusalem’s house was left desolate because she refused to receive the Messiah (Lk. 19:41-44; Jno. 1:11). We must learn from Jerusalem’s demise that God judges sin, including those of His people. When Christians turn away from the Lord and reject His truth and mercy, we face the righteous judgment of God for our sins (Rom. 2:1-6). The gospel calls on Christians to abandon sin through repentance and embrace the spiritual blessings that are in Christ (2 Cor. 12:20-21; Eph. 1:3). “Knowing, therefore, the terror of the Lord, we persuade men” (2 Cor. 5:11). Beware. Practicing sin will not go unpunished. Christian friend, if there is sin in your life, repent and turn to the Lord without delay (1 Jno. 1:8-9).

The Certainty of Christ’s Words #2003

Heaven and earth will pass away, but My words will by no means pass away. (Luke 21:33, NKJV)

The certainty of Christ’s words comforts Christians. His explanations are sure, and His promises are steadfast. His truth abides. In this context, Jesus answered questions from His disciples about the destruction of the Jerusalem temple by telling them to watch for signs to come (Lk. 21:5-7). He warned them not to be deceived by false teachers and fake news “in His name” (Lk. 21:8). Jesus told them not to be frightened when they heard of wars, national upheavals, and natural calamities (Lk. 21:9-11). He warned them of persecution, betrayal, and hatred from their enemies, but also of the inspiration He would give them and deliverance they would receive through their patient endurance (Lk. 21:12-19). Armies would surround Jerusalem – a clear sign for believers to “flee to the mountains” to escape the divine vengeance that would befall Jerusalem (Lk. 21:20-24). The sacking of Jerusalem by the Gentiles would be ample evidence that the Son of Man is ruling in heaven and executing judgment against faithless Jerusalem (Lk. 21:25-31; Matt. 23:37-39; 24:29-31). Jesus boldly affirmed all these things would occur before that generation died (Lk. 21:32). And, so they did. The Roman armies led by Titus attacked Jerusalem in A.D. 70, destroying the temple and enslaving tens of thousands. When Jesus speaks, His word comes to pass. Like those disciples, let us be patient and possess our souls (Lk. 21:19). Redemption is near (Lk. 21:28; Jas. 5:7-11).

Listen to Jesus Early and Often #1908

Then early in the morning all the people came to Him in the temple to hear Him. (Luke 21:38, NKJV)

The excitement in Jerusalem had been building daily, ever since Jesus came into the city riding on a young donkey. Anticipating the deliverance of Israel from the oppression of her enemies, the people had lined His pathway with clothes and palm branches as He entered the city (Matt. 21:1-11; Lk. 19:36-40). Their king had arrived (Jno. 12:13)! People came early each morning and listened attentively to Jesus (Lk. 19:48). The crescendo was nearing its apex, but the climactic event would not be as the crowd envisioned. Soon, in frenzied dismay, they would cry out, ”Crucify Him!” Until then, Jesus kept teaching in the temple daily. “Why did He bother?” you ask? The Son was doing the work His Father gave Him (Jno. 12:27-36). Now, we have what He taught that week in the inspired Scriptures for our faith and salvation. I wonder, are we as eager to hear what Jesus says as they were? And if so, are we also eager to do what He says? We cannot correctly call Jesus our Lord if we believe what He says but do not obey Him (Lk. 6:46). Let us always listen to Jesus – early in the morning, late at night, and all through the day. May we believe Him, obey Him, and so be delivered from sin and death as citizens of His kingdom (Jno. 18:36-37; Col. 1:13-14).

“Cursed in the man who trust in man and makes flesh his strength” #1858

Thus says the Lord: “Cursed is the man who trusts in man and makes flesh his strength, whose heart departs from the Lord.” (Jeremiah 17:5, NKJV)

Before and during the days of Jeremiah, Jerusalem and Judah had trusted in powerless idols, shaped and fashioned after the will and imaginations of men, to sustain protect them and bless them. The idolatrous “altars and their wooden images” exposed their sins to God’s just and fiery punishment (Jer. 17:1-4). God made their sins and punishment very clear to them. It is always thus when one “trusts in man and makes flesh his strength.” One is left to a barren wasteland, void of spiritual blessings when the heart departs from the Lord: “For he shall be like a shrub in the desert, and shall not see when good comes, but shall inhabit the parched places in the wilderness, in a salt land which is not inhabited” (Jer. 17:6). Many think they can survive without God, trusting in themselves and others. Instead of this, one should trust the Lord and follow His will: “Blessed is the man who trusts in the Lord, and whose hope is the Lord” (Jer. 17:7). Doing so brings spiritual life, protection, and productivity, “like a tree planted by the waters…” (Jer. 17:8). When we trust in men instead of God we are living with a “this world” perspective. Trusting in God means we put our faith in the true God and look beyond this world. By faith, we live for eternal realms of glory (Heb. 11:13-16). Our hope is in the Lord.

Avoiding Sin’s Temptations #1843

It happened in the spring of the year, at the time when kings go out to battle, that David sent Joab and his servants with him, and all Israel; and they destroyed the people of Ammon and besieged Rabbah. But David remained at Jerusalem. (2 Samuel 11:1, NKJV)

Today’s verse introduces the record of king David’s sins of adultery, deception, and murder. It contains lessons that help protect us from spiritual danger – if we will heed the warnings. 1) David was not where he should have been. Where we are matters. Instead of leading his army into battle against the Ammonite enemy, he remained in Jerusalem while his general and servants took his army into battle. The obvious lesson is go where you ought to be, and avoid places of temptation (Eph. 5:15). 2) David was not at Rabbah when he should have been there. When we are where we are matters. Winter was over, spring has arrived, and David should have been besieging Rabbah. When we do not redeem our time to accomplish God’s will, we expose ourselves to temptations of neglect, waste, and worldliness (Eph. 5:16). 3) David was doing what he should not have been doing. What we are doing matters. Remaining in Jerusalem was comfortable, and more convenient than being encamped on the battlefield, but the cost was great. Putting personal comfort ahead of duty tempts us with selfish desires and the allurements of sin (Jas. 1:14). Avoid sin by being where you should be, when you should be there, doing what you ought to do.