Tag Archives: Jesus

Jesus Blessed the Children #2406

13 Then they brought little children to Him, that He might touch them; but the disciples rebuked those who brought them. 14 But when Jesus saw it, He was greatly displeased and said to them, “Let the little children come to Me, and do not forbid them; for of such is the kingdom of God. 15 Assuredly, I say to you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God as a little child will by no means enter it.” 16 And He took them up in His arms, laid His hands on them, and blessed them (Mark 10:13–16, NKJV).

Jesus loves the little children. Their innocence, humble dependence, and eagerness are among the qualities that illustrate the character of all who receive the kingdom of God. We can learn much from this tender scene. (1) Parents should bring their children to Jesus by teaching and leading them to Christ. Those who brought their children to Jesus knew the value of His blessing. Even so, “Fathers, do not provoke your children to wrath, but bring them up in the training and admonition of the Lord” (Eph. 6:4). Train your children in the ways of the Lord. (2) Like Jesus, we should take time to be with children. They remind us of a simpler time, pure and free from the stresses, anxieties, and troubles of life. Time spent with children invigorates the soul. Children are not in the way, nuisances or unwarranted distractions. (They were not that to Jesus.) Among the tragedies of every abortion is the devaluing of an innocent child’s life. Additionally, abandoning children to an evil world without the presence and blessing of Jesus is a horrifying reality in the lives of far too many children. (3) Never prevent someone from coming to Jesus. Once we grasp the value of His blessing, we will help others seek Him (John 1:41-42, 43-46; Matt. 11:28-30).

Strange Things #2405

And they were all amazed, and they glorified God and were filled with fear, saying, “We have seen strange things today!” (Luke 5:26, NKJV)

Jesus was ordinary and extraordinary. His physical appearance was nothing exceptional, but His teachings were (Isa. 53:2; Luke 5:26; Mark 2:12). They were astonishing and authoritative, far surpassing what the people heard from the scribes (Matt. 7:28-29). When officers were sent to seize Him, they returned empty-handed, admitting, “No man ever spoke like this Man” (John 7:32, 45-46). The strange thing the people saw in today’s passage was Jesus giving miraculous proof He is the Son of Man who forgives sins (Luke 5:17-25). Jesus saw the faith of those who had lowered the man through the roof into His presence. They believed Jesus could heal him. Jesus did so much more by healing his soul of sin. Some who heard Him thought Jesus spoke blasphemy, so He challenged them to believe He is God by healing the man. Extraordinary, miraculous proof. Only God can forgive sins and heal the lame. Jesus did things contrary to expectation (i.e., “strange”). The reactions were varied: The healed man glorified God, the people who saw these things praised God in their astonishment, but the scribes and Pharisees refused to believe in Jesus. His extraordinary words and works should compel us to believe and follow Him (like Matthew, Luke 5:27-28; Matt. 9:9).

A True Friend #2401

Now when he had finished speaking to Saul, the soul of Jonathan was knit to the soul of David, and Jonathan loved him as his own soul.” (1 Samuel 18:1, NKJV)

Jonathan (the son of king Saul) and David were dear friends. Jonathan did not see David as a threat, far from it. Their souls were knit together, even closer than brothers (Prov. 18:24). Friendship is a marvelous blessing to be cultivated and nurtured. Like Jonathan and David, friends are more than neighbors. Friends are familiar, trusted, and devoted as they share life (1 Sam. 18:3-4; Ps. 41:9). Jonathan and David’s friendship was strong due to their common mind and faith. Their love for one another was great (1 Sam. 18:3-4; 2 Sam. 1:25-26). When Jonathan’s father Saul threatened David’s life, Jonathan endangered himself to protect his friend (1 Sam. 20:4, 16-42). Facebook may say you have many “friends,” but the Bible defines true friendship differently. Consider the following: (1) A friend gives sound counsel even when it hurts. “Faithful are the wounds of a friend, but the kisses of an enemy are deceitful” (Prov. 27:6). A friend does not try to manipulate you. A friend’s counsel may hurt, but its goal is to help us, and so, “the sweetness of a man’s friend gives delight by hearty counsel” (Prov. 27:9). (2) Choose your friends carefully. “The righteous should choose his friends carefully, For the way of the wicked leads them astray” (Prov. 12:26). Like Jonathan and David, a shared faith will see you and your friend through life’s trials (1 Sam. 20:12-17). Friends can also hinder your faithfulness to God (1 Cor. 15:33). Choose wisely. (3) Be a friend to Jesus. “You are My friends if you do whatever I command you” (John 15:14). Jesus will be your true friend. Are you His? Obey Him and it will be so.

We See Jesus #2390

8 “You have put all things in subjection under his feet.” For in that He put all in subjection under him, He left nothing that is not put under him. But now we do not yet see all things put under him. 9 But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels, for the suffering of death crowned with glory and honor, that He, by the grace of God, might taste death for everyone (Hebrews 2:8–9, NKJV).

Jesus Christ has been given all authority in heaven and earth (Matt. 28:18; Eph. 1:20-23). Although “we do not yet see (horao, discern clearly, JRP) all things put under” the authority of Jesus, we see (blepo, behold, sight) many things about Him. The writer of Hebrews draws our attention to the humanity of Jesus in chapter two, having already defined and described His deity in chapter one. When we pause to look at Jesus, we see the magnificence of the Savior. (1) We see His humility to be made lower than the angels for a little while. Leaving the glory of heaven, He submitted to becoming human to be an offering for sin (Phil. 2:7-8; Heb. 10:5, 10). In Him alone was “all the fullness of the Godhead bodily” (Col. 2:9). (2) We see Jesus becoming human to suffer and die. The painful humiliation and injustice of the cross was an act of willful obedience on His part (Phil. 2:8; Heb. 5:8). (3) We see God’s grace in His death for everyone. We see the paradox of the cruel cross as God’s blessed favor is revealed in the sacrifice of His Son for us. “And of His fullness we have all received, and grace for grace” (John 1:16). (4) We see Jesus crowned with glory and honor. Resurrected and exalted in the heavens as God’s right hand, Jesus is king on His throne and High Priest over God’s house (Heb. 1:13, 8-9; 2:17; 8:1-2). Praise God that the Son became flesh and dwelt among us, to die for us, and to blaze the trail to glory for us (Heb. 2:10).

Appointed Days #2389

1 We then, as workers together with Him also plead with you not to receive the grace of God in vain. 2 For He says: “In an acceptable time I have heard you, and in the day of salvation I have helped you.” Behold, now is the accepted time; behold, now is the day of salvation” (2 Corinthians 6:1–2, NKJV).

Christians are repeatedly warned in the Scriptures to beware of falling away from God, His grace, and the faith (Heb. 3:12-13; Gal. 5:4; 1 Tim. 4:1; James 5:19-20). Embedded in this warning in 2 Corinthians 6:1 is a call to urgency by recognizing “the accepted time” and “day of salvation” and diligently receiving and standing in God’s grace (2 Cor. 6:2). Consider the days appointed by God that urge us to respond to God’s grace in faith and be saved in Christ. (1) The day of salvation (2 Cor. 6:2). This day is the gospel age. Salvation is available to all who believe (John 1:12; Mark 16:15-16; Rom. 10:8-13; Acts 2:36-38). God appointed this time to believe and obey the gospel for salvation and eternal life (Gal. 4:4). (2) The day of death (Heb. 9:27). Death is the great equalizer (Eccl. 2:14; 9:2-3; 12:6-7). Jesus releases the children of God from the fear of death (Heb. 2:14-15). Death is a great incentive to be a Christian and live by faith, not fear. (3) The day of judgment (Acts 17:31; Heb. 9:27). God calls us to repent because He will “judge the world in righteousness” by His Jesus Christ. God has confirmed a day of judgment is coming by raising Jesus from the dead. Therefore, God commands us to repent (Acts 17:30). We do not know when we will die or when the day of judgment will happen. But we know “now is the day of salvation.” Believe and obey Jesus to be prepared for the day of your death and judgment (2 Cor. 5:10).

Righteous Judgment about Jesus #2386

40 Therefore many from the crowd, when they heard this saying, said, “Truly this is the Prophet.” 41 Others said, “This is the Christ.” But some said, “Will the Christ come out of Galilee? 42 Has not the Scripture said that the Christ comes from the seed of David and from the town of Bethlehem, where David was?” (John 7:40–42, NKJV)

John 7 records the belief, skepticism, and opposition to Jesus in Jerusalem during the Feast of Tabernacles (John 7:2, 10-13). The multitude did not speak openly about Him for fear of their leaders, but Jesus “went up into the temple and taught” publicly (John 7:14). Like today, His words and works stirred different reactions. (1) The multitude charged Jesus with having a demon (John 7:20-24). (2) The citizens of Jerusalem marveled at His boldness under threat of death (John 7:25-27). (3) The Jewish leaders (Sanhedrin) sent officers to arrest Him, perplexed at His teaching (John 7:32-36, 44). The officers returned empty-handed, saying, “No man ever spoke like this man” (John 7:45-46). (4) The crowd was divided over whether Jesus was “the Prophet” or “the Christ” (John 7:40-42). Moses told of God sending a prophet like him (Deut. 18:15, 18-19). God’s Servant, the Messiah, fulfilled this role (Isa. 42:1-4; Acts 3:22-24). The Christ did indeed come from “the seed of David and from the town of Bethlehem, where David was” (2 Sam. 7:12-14; Isa. 11:1-2; Micah 5:2). Those who said Jesus could not be the Christ since He came from Galilee, failing to consider his birthplace (John 7:1, 9-10). Jesus is “the Prophet” who spoke the Father’s doctrine (John 7:16-18). Jesus is the Christ who gives living water for the soul (John 7:37-38; Isa. 55:1-5; Rev. 22:17). Christ is the Prophet we must hear. This is righteous judgment about Jesus (John 7:24).

“He has done all things well” #2385

And they were astonished beyond measure, saying, “He has done all things well. He makes both the deaf to hear and the mute to speak” (Mark 7:37, NKJV).

In every sense of the word, Jesus was good and did all things well. People were amazed as they heard Him teach and saw His miraculous works. He was no ordinary prophet; No ordinary man of God. Having returned from the Gentile regions of Tyre and Sidon to the Hellenist cities east of the Sea of Galilee, people approached Jesus, begging Him to heal a deaf man whose speech was also impeded (Mark 7:31-32). Jesus healed the man, and although He commanded them not to speak of it, they spread the word of His great goodness (Mark 7:33-36). Three things impress us about Jesus doing all things well. (1) See the beauty in all Jesus did. The word they used (“well”) of what Jesus did denotes something beautiful. Every work of Jesus was stunning and impressive, bearing the marks of God’s powerful presence. Would that the beauty of Jesus be seen in all we do. (2) See the value of all Jesus did. We do not measure His work in silver and gold, but in the blessings He gave. He lived what He taught, “It is more blessed to give than to receive” (Acts 20:35). The most valuable gift of all was giving Himself for the world’s sins John 10:18). (3) See the virtue of all Jesus did. His motives were always honest, pure, and holy. Jesus was genuine. His virtuous heart and life are our models as disciples (Luke 6:40). Indeed. Jesus has done all things well.

The Son Reveals the Father #2383

who being the brightness of His glory and the express image of His person, and upholding all things by the word of His power, when He had by Himself purged our sins, sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high (Hebrews 1:3, NKJV).

The Son of God, Jesus Christ, is the exact manifestation of God to the world. He and the Father are one; He is “equal with God” (John 10:30-36; 5:17-18). He is deity. Therefore, to see Him is to see the Father (John 14:9). The Son reveals the Father’s character, His nature, and traits. Today’s verse describes two things about God possessed by the Son. (1) The Son shows us the brightness of God’s glory. Jesus is the radiance or brilliance of the Father’s dignity and majesty. As the sun’s rays radiate the grandeur of the sun itself, so the Son is the vivid display of God’s splendor. From God’s glorious love and grace to the dignity of His authority and judgments, the Son reveals the magnificence of God to humanity. (2) The Son is the exact image of God. “No one has seen God at any time. The only begotten Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, He has declared Him” (John 1:18). The Son is the image (impress) of God’s “person” (“substance,” ASV; “nature,” NASB95; God’s real being). The Son, by whom God speaks to us, is the exact representation and revelation of God (Heb. 1:2). The Son’s deity establishes Him as the One we must hear and heed. He has inherited all things, having also participated in creating everything (Heb. 1:2; Col. 1:15-16). He continues to maintain all things by His powerful word now that He has purged our sins and sits at the right hand of God (Col. 1:14, 17; Eph. 1:20-23). May we hear the Son and give Him our complete allegiance in faithful service, for in Him “dwells all the fullness of the Godhead bodily” (Col. 2:9).

Are You Listening to Jesus? #2375

1 God, who at various times and in various ways spoke in time past to the fathers by the prophets, 2 has in these last days spoken to us by His Son, whom He has appointed heir of all things, through whom also He made the worlds (Hebrews 1:1–2, NKJV).

When Jesus was transfigured on the mount, “a voice came to Him from the Excellent Glory,” saying, “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.” The voice commanded to “Hear Him” (2 Pet. 1:17; Matt. 17:5). All are under divine order to hear Jesus. By doing so, we are listening to God since God “has in these last days spoken to us by His Son.” How does Jesus speak to us? Not through living prophets like God did to the Hebrew fathers (Heb. 1:1). Not through dreams and visions like in times past. Not by so-called personal promptings of the Spirit (subjective notions attributed to the Spirit of God). Jesus said by receiving those He sent into the world (His apostles), we receive Him and the One who sent Him (John 13:20). The salvation Jesus began to speak was “confirmed to us by those who heard Him” (His apostles, Heb. 2:3-4; Mark 16:15-18). We “shall not escape if we neglect” the great salvation they preached (John 16:13; Mark 16:20). When Pentecost believers heard and received the apostles’ words, they repented and were baptized and, thus saved, were added by the Lord to the church (Acts 2:37-41, 47). Christ saves every soul the same way today. Yes, we must hear Jesus today. How? By receiving, obeying, and continuing in the word His apostles taught (Acts 2:41-42; 10:42-43; 1 Cor. 14:37; 2 Tim. 3:16-17).

Christ’s Obedience to the Father Was Love, Not Legalism #2367

30 I will no longer talk much with you, for the ruler of this world is coming, and he has nothing in Me. 31 But that the world may know that I love the Father, and as the Father gave Me commandment, so I do. Arise, let us go from here (John 14:30–31, NKJV).

Jesus was about to be arrested, tried, and condemned to death by crucifixion. We marvel at God’s love for us by which He “gave His only begotten Son” for the redemption of sinners (John 3:16; 1 John 3:16; 4:8-10). Today’s passage adds another element to God’s love for us; the Son’s love for the Father. Jesus’s death on the cross was not only the great expression of divine love for humanity but also the great expression of His obedient love for His Father (Rom. 5:8; John 6:38; 10:18). Christ’s love for the Father compelled Him to do the Father’s will, becoming “obedient to the point of death, even the death of the cross” (Phil. 2:8). His sacrificial, selfless obedience makes Him the Exemplar of love. You see, previously in today’s passage, Jesus had told His apostles, “If you love Me, keep my commandments” (John 14:15). Jesus holds His disciples to the same standard He followed; to express our love for Him through faithful obedience. We ought not to view obedience as a legalistic approach to discipleship but as love’s full measure of devotion. As John wrote, “My little children, let us not love in word or in tongue, but in deed and truth” (1 John 3:18). It is no wonder that Jesus saves those who obey Him (Heb. 5:8-9). Today and hereafter, “arise, let us go from here” and in love obey the Father and the Son.