Tag Archives: miracles

The Miracles of Jesus #2462

25 But Jesus rebuked him, saying, “Be quiet, and come out of him!” 26 And when the unclean spirit had convulsed him and cried out with a loud voice, he came out of him. 27 Then they were all amazed, so that they questioned among themselves, saying, “What is this? What new doctrine is this? For with authority He commands even the unclean spirits, and they obey Him.” 28 And immediately His fame spread throughout all the region around Galilee (Mark 1:25–28, NKJV).

Why did Jesus work miracles? The answers are in their motive and effect. The motive of compassion is stated repeatedly for His miracles that removed powerfully removed people’s pain and suffering (Mark 1:41; 5:19; 8:2; Matt. 20:33). (It is noteworthy that His compassion also moved Jesus to teach the word of God, Mark 6:34.) The effect of His miracles was to provide evidence that God sent Him and that His teaching is the word of God (Mark 1:27; John 3:2; 5:36; 20:30-31; Acts 2:22). As in today’s passage, the power of His miracles grabbed people’s attention and supported the authority by which He spoke (Mark 1:21-22, 27-28). God does not work miracles through us today (1 Cor. 13:8-10). Instead, the inspired record of first-century miracles shows Jesus is the Christ, and His gospel is God’s word (John 20:30-31; Acts 14:3). Compassion continues to be His disciples’ motive for helping the weak and teaching the gospel to the lost (Luke 10:33-37; Col. 3:12; 1 Pet. 3:8-9; Matt. 9:35-38; Jude 22-23).

Signs to an Evil Generation #2443

29 And while the crowds were thickly gathered together, He began to say, “This is an evil generation. It seeks a sign, and no sign will be given to it except the sign of Jonah the prophet. 30 For as Jonah became a sign to the Ninevites, so also the Son of Man will be to this generation (Luke 11:29–30, NKJV).

The society in which Jesus lived and worked was evil. Oh, there were exceptions, to be sure. But, many people crowded around Jesus to see wonders but not to be convinced to believe and follow Him. Some followed Him around looking for personal advantages (John 6:26). Their constant clamoring for signs from Jesus showed their unwillingness to believe and follow Him (John 10:24-26). But, God attested His approval of Jesus “by miracles, wonders, and signs which God did through Him” (Acts 2:22; John 5:36). The “sign of Jonah” was yet to occur. His resurrection from the dead would declare His Sonship to the world (Rom. 1:4). Jonah’s three days and night in the great fish illustrated what would happen to Jesus. He would die, be buried, and arise from the dead on the third day (Matt. 12:40). The sign of Jonah’s “resurrection” convinced the Ninevites his message was from God, they repented, and God spared the city from destruction (Jonah 3:1-10). The resurrection of Jesus convinced many to repent toward God, turn from evil, and follow Him (Acts 2:41; 4:4; 10:40-43). It still does. We have a competent, inspired record of His signs and resurrection to convince us to hear, believe, and follow Jesus (John 20:30-31). Don’t seek new miracles to convince you to follow Jesus. His signs have happened. They are recorded in the Scriptures for the world to know, believe, and follow Jesus, the Son of God.

“I am the Son of God” #2399

34 Jesus answered them, “Is it not written in your law, ‘I said, “You are gods” ’? 35 If He called them gods, to whom the word of God came (and the Scripture cannot be broken), 36 do you say of Him whom the Father sanctified and sent into the world, ‘You are blaspheming,’ because I said, ‘I am the Son of God’? 37 If I do not do the works of My Father, do not believe Me; 38 but if I do, though you do not believe Me, believe the works, that you may know and believe that the Father is in Me, and I in Him.”” (John 10:34–38, NKJV)

Jesus supported His teaching that He is the Son of God from Psalm 82:6 by making a logical progression from the lesser to the greater. (His reasoning was sound; Scripture’s binding authority “cannot be broken,” John 10:35.) This Scripture described men as “gods” in their capacity as judges (John 10:34). Since men (who worked as judges among the people) were called gods, Jesus (who worked miracles among the people) could be called the Son of God (John 10:36-38). His mighty works were sufficient evidence that He and the Father “are one” (i.e., “the Father is in Me, and I in Him,” John 10:25, 30, 38). Jesus did not commit blasphemy by saying so; He spoke the truth (John 10:36). Those who wanted to stone Jesus for blasphemy were not convinced and unsuccessfully tried to seize Him (John 10:31-33, 39). The miraculous signs of Jesus demonstrate He is the Son of God. The question to ask ourselves is whether we believe this truth or deny the words and works of Jesus like they did (John 10:37-39). What will your answer be?

“He has done all things well” #2385

And they were astonished beyond measure, saying, “He has done all things well. He makes both the deaf to hear and the mute to speak” (Mark 7:37, NKJV).

In every sense of the word, Jesus was good and did all things well. People were amazed as they heard Him teach and saw His miraculous works. He was no ordinary prophet; No ordinary man of God. Having returned from the Gentile regions of Tyre and Sidon to the Hellenist cities east of the Sea of Galilee, people approached Jesus, begging Him to heal a deaf man whose speech was also impeded (Mark 7:31-32). Jesus healed the man, and although He commanded them not to speak of it, they spread the word of His great goodness (Mark 7:33-36). Three things impress us about Jesus doing all things well. (1) See the beauty in all Jesus did. The word they used (“well”) of what Jesus did denotes something beautiful. Every work of Jesus was stunning and impressive, bearing the marks of God’s powerful presence. Would that the beauty of Jesus be seen in all we do. (2) See the value of all Jesus did. We do not measure His work in silver and gold, but in the blessings He gave. He lived what He taught, “It is more blessed to give than to receive” (Acts 20:35). The most valuable gift of all was giving Himself for the world’s sins John 10:18). (3) See the virtue of all Jesus did. His motives were always honest, pure, and holy. Jesus was genuine. His virtuous heart and life are our models as disciples (Luke 6:40). Indeed. Jesus has done all things well.

Hear Christ by Hearing His Messengers #2378

He who hears you hears Me, he who rejects you rejects Me, and he who rejects Me rejects Him who sent Me (Luke 10:16, NKJV).

Jesus empowered seventy disciples with miracles and a message when He sent them into cities ahead of Him (Luke 10:1, 9). Their message was, “The kingdom of God has come near to you,” and their miracles certified its validity (Luke 10:17-20). Therefore, those who rejected them and their message rejected Jesus and the Father who sent Him. (Necessarily, the converse would also be true. To receive them and their message would be to receive Jesus and His Father, John 13:20.) Judgment without mercy would descend on the city that refused Christ’s message and messengers (Luke 10:11-15). This reality warns us not to “refuse Him who speaks” to us today (Heb. 12:25). God speaks to us by His Son, who sent out His apostles with His gospel of salvation (Heb. 1:1-2; 2:1-4; Matt. 28:18-20). We cannot discount and discard the apostles’ teachings in the inspired Scriptures and have any expectation of God’s approval (1 Cor. 14:37; 2 Tim. 3:16-17). I recently read a report that almost 40% of those surveyed think a person who does not believe in God can (will) go to heaven. Yet, “If the righteous one is scarcely saved, where will the ungodly and the sinner appear” (1 Pet. 4:18)? Unbelievers do not go to heaven but hell (Rev. 21:8). Christ calls us to receive His word and follow Him. Then we will be received by Him (Acts 2:36-42).

Necessary Inferences Needed To Believe in Christ #2306

2 And when John had heard in prison about the works of Christ, he sent two of his disciples 3 and said to Him, “Are You the Coming One, or do we look for another?” 4 Jesus answered and said to them, “Go and tell John the things which you hear and see: 5 The blind see and the lame walk; the lepers are cleansed and the deaf hear; the dead are raised up and the poor have the gospel preached to them. 6 And blessed is he who is not offended because of Me” (Matthew 11:2–6, NKJV).

A necessary inference is an unavoidable, inescapable conclusion drawn from the information given. It is not merely a reasonable inference or a conclusion that may appear so (John 21:21-23; 7:24). It is the only legitimate conclusion the information given will allow. Notice in today’s passage the things Jesus said and did were (and still are) sufficient evidence for John and his followers to draw the necessary conclusion that He is the Christ. Instead of answering, “Yes, I am the Christ,” Jesus directed John’s disciples to His words and works as evidence from which they should conclude that the Father sent Him (John 5:36). The prophets had foretold of the works He did (Isa. 35:5-7; 61:1-2). Yes, He is the Coming One. Necessary inferences from the testimony of God’s word build our faith and direct our conduct. To suggest they are an artificial approach to understanding the Scriptures denies Christ who used them to establish faith in Himself as the Son of God.

“God is In Control” #2240

Whatever the Lord pleases He does, in heaven and in earth, in the seas and in all deep places” (Psalm 135:6, NKJV).

“God is in control.” We hear that a lot, but what does that mean? The Scriptures help us understand God’s control over the world. (1) God’s sovereign will prevails on earth (Psa. 135:6; Dan. 4:34-35). “He rules and works according to His eternal purpose even through events that seem to contradict or oppose His rule” (Holman, 1523). (2) God did not create the world and then walk away from it. The false theology that only nature’s laws operate in this world is called Deism. It rejects God’s interaction with His creation whether by revelation, by miracles, or by answering prayers (Eph. 3:3-5; Heb. 2:4; Matt. 7:7-11; Acts 14:17). (3) God does not control every event in your life. Free will means we can choose between good and evil, and our choices have consequences (Deut. 30:19; Gal. 6:7-8). Conversely, fatalism is the “doctrine that events are fixed in advance so that human beings are powerless to change them” (Merriam-Webster). Calvinism’s doctrine of predestination is false since God gave us free will (Josh. 24:15). (4) God’s plan for us is that we fear Him and keep His commandments (Eccl. 12:13). His will and purposes prevail in heaven and earth, and human redemption in Christ is the centerpiece (Rom. 8:28-30). Through the gospel, God is calling us to believe and obey Him to be saved and walk with Him in life and eternity (Mark 16:15-16; 1 John 1:5-10; Matt. 7:21-23).

Acting on The Evidence of Truth #2094

1 There was a man of the Pharisees named Nicodemus, a ruler of the Jews. 2 This man came to Jesus by night and said to Him, “Rabbi, we know that You are a teacher come from God; for no one can do these signs that You do unless God is with him.” (John 3:1–2, NKJV)

Yesterday’s Sword Tips (#2093) observed Philip telling Nathanael to “come and see” whether anything good could come from Nazareth (Jno. 1:43-47). The evidence proving Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God is abundant, but we must “come and see” for ourselves. Christians will not force you to believe and follow Jesus. (But note, Jesus said your choice will have eternal results, John 12:48-50.) Nicodemus had seen Jesus work miracles, or he had heard about them from credible witnesses. He drew a necessary conclusion that God had sent Jesus and God was with Jesus from the signs Jesus did. The process of learning and examination is how God presents the truth of the gospel to the world. Competent eyewitnesses of the words and works of Jesus (His apostles) preached the gospel message of salvation in Jesus Christ (Mk. 16:15-20; Acts 1:8; 10:38-43). We preach that same gospel today (2 Tim. 4:2-4). Those who heard the apostolic message had a choice to make: Believe, obey, and be saved, or disbelieve and be lost (Mk. 16:16; Acts 2:36-41; 13:44-48). You and I and the whole world have the same decision to make. By the way, Nicodemus was not saved because he believed Jesus came from God. Only when he entered the kingdom of God by the new birth of water and the Spirit would he be saved from his sins (Jno. 3:3-5). So it is for every lost soul today.

Christ Confirms Christians with the Confirmed Gospel #1818

4 I thank my God always concerning you for the grace of God which was given to you by Christ Jesus, 5 that you were enriched in everything by Him in all utterance and all knowledge, 6 even as the testimony of Christ was confirmed in you, 7 so that you come short in no gift, eagerly waiting for the revelation of our Lord Jesus Christ, 8 who will also confirm you to the end, that you may be blameless in the day of our Lord Jesus Christ. (1 Corinthians 1:4–8, NKJV)

God’s grace, given by Christ Jesus, came to the Corinthians in the same way it goes to the four corners of the world, through gospel preaching and its acceptance (Mk. 16:15; Titus 2:11-12). In “all utterance and all knowledge” the “gospel of the grace of God” enriches souls who believe it and obey it (Acts 20:24, 32; Col. 1:5-6). Notably, the gospel (“the testimony of Christ”) was confirmed (verified, settled) in the Corinthians (undoubtedly, a reference to the miraculous gifts they received through the apostle (v. 6-7; Mk. 16:17-20; 1 Cor. 12:1). This had enriched them in Christ, but their faith still needed to be confirmed (settled, strengthened, v. 7-8). Like them, the Lord settles (verifies, stabilizes) our faith when we live by His settled gospel (“the testimony of Christ,” v. 6). We may correctly say the Lord uses the confirmed gospel (v. 6) to confirm Christians (v. 8). Our task in being strengthened is to take His gospel into our hearts and live it. By doing so we will not be blamed (be “blameless”) but settled when Christ is revealed in the day of judgment (v. 8).

“Be Filled with the Spirit” #1738

And do not be drunk with wine, in which is dissipation; but be filled with the Spirit,” (Ephesians 5:18, NKJV)

Christians are to be filled with the Spirit, not intoxicated with alcohol. But, what does that mean? Does it mean having a warm feeling in the heart, confident in feeling that we please God? No, since “There is a way that seems right to a man, but its end is the way of death” (Prov. 14:12). Since the Scriptures do not assign our feelings to the Holy Spirit, neither can we. Does it mean claiming some miracle at work in our lives? No, since the purpose of the miraculous gifts of the Spirit has been accomplished. Plus, how those gifts were received is no longer possible (1 Cor. 13:8-10; Acts 8:14-17). To “be filled with the Spirit” is a commandment, therefore, we choose whether or not the Spirit will fill us. Paul’s parallel statement in Colossians 3:16 says to “let the word of Christ dwell in you richly,” persuading us to conclude we keep this command by imbibing of the Spirit’s word which He communicated to us by the apostles and prophets of Jesus (Jno. 16:8, 12-13; 1 Cor. 2:10-13; Eph. 3:5). Instead of filling your body with spirits that rob you of soberness, sound judgment, and honorable conduct, fill your soul with the holy directives of revealed truth. In this way, by being filled with the Spirit you will dwell with Him and bear His fruit in your life (Gal. 5:22-23).