Tag Archives: prayers

Learn to Live in the Fear of the Lord #2007

11 Come, you children, listen to me; I will teach you the fear of the Lord. 12 Who is the man who desires life, and loves many days, that he may see good? 13 Keep your tongue from evil, and your lips from speaking deceit. 14 Depart from evil and do good; Seek peace and pursue it. 15 The eyes of the Lord are on the righteous, and His ears are open to their cry. 16 The face of the Lord is against those who do evil, to cut off the remembrance of them from the earth. (Psalm 34:11–16, NKJV)

Fear of the Lord is not theoretical. It is practical and reveals itself in how we live our lives. Here, the inspired psalmist David teaches how to respect and reverence God. We will know the fear of the Lord if we listen to his instruction, and our lives will be blessed. Living a full life that delights in its joy is realized when we 1) Control our language (v. 13). Our words reveal our hearts. 2) Turn away from evil and practice good things that advance peace (v. 14). Pursue peace with God and with others, and you will it replaces chaos with tranquility. 3) Remember that the Lord attends to the needs of the righteous (v. 15). God has promised to provide our needs when we prioritize His will in our lives (Matt. 6:31-33). He hears and responds to the prayers of righteous people. 4) Remember that the Lord opposes those who practice evil (v. 16). Pursuing evil does not bring happiness now or in eternity; only pain and eternal death. God and others see whether the “fear of the Lord” is in our lives. When it is, whatever life brings our way becomes a blessing (1 Pet. 3:8-13).

Pray for those in Authority #1965

1 Therefore I exhort first of all that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks be made for all men, 2 for kings and all who are in authority, that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and reverence. (1 Timothy 2:1–2, NKJV)

Paul began a series of exhortations to Timothy with an appeal to pray “for all men.” Jesus had taught to “pray for those who spitefully use you” as an expression of loving your enemies (Lk. 6:27-28). That is not easy to do, but it is the very essence of loving our neighbor as ourselves. Since love focuses on others rather than itself, therein lies the answer to how we can faithfully do this. We need to pray for those who have rule and authority over us. The reasons are apparent (yet Paul reminds Timothy and us of them). Their decisions impact many lives, including Christians. God desires us to lead peaceful lives, flavored with godliness, and infused with reverence. Therefore, supplicate (entreaty) God for them. Solicit God on their behalf for truth, wisdom, and justice to guide them in the affairs of state. Petition the Ruler of rulers, interceding for them through earnest prayers and thoughtful thanks. Paul reminds us that God desires the salvation of all people (1 Tim. 2:3-4). Therefore, let us diligently pray for leaders (and all others) so that an atmosphere that enhances the cause of the gospel may prevail on the earth.

Prayers for Physical Health #1742

1 The Elder, To the beloved Gaius, whom I love in truth: 2 Beloved, I pray that you may prosper in all things and be in health, just as your soul prospers. (3 John 1–2, NKJV)

Recently I was asked for some Scriptures that talk about offering prayers for the physical health of others. Today’s passage is one such passage. We should absolutely be praying for one another’s spiritual health: “Confess your trespasses to one another, and pray for one another, that you may be healed. The effective, fervent prayer of a righteous man avails much” (Jas. 5:16). It is also right and good to pray for others as they face the trials, uncertainties, pain and discomforts of illness and disease. James instructed calling for the elders to pray over the sick in James 4:14. A general statement to offer supplications (requests) for all people is given in 1 Timothy 2:1, no doubt including prayers for the flesh as well as the spirit. The church’s prayers for Peter’s life necessarily included his physical well-being (Acts 12:5). Paul told of praying about his physical ailment in 2 Corinthians 12:7-8. God answered Paul’s prayer, confirming He hears and answers prayers about our physical health, just as surely as He does those offered for our spiritual health. When we pray for someone’s health or our own, we do so fully assured God hears and answers us according to His will (1 Jno. 5:14-15). Whatever the outcome, we rejoice in God’s grace and the strength we have in Christ (2 Cor. 12:9-10).

God’s Eternal Nature Assures Us #1296

24 I said, “O my God, do not take me away in the midst of my days; Your years are throughout all generations. 25 Of old You laid the foundation of the earth, and the heavens are the work of Your hands. 26 They will perish, but You will endure; Yes, they will all grow old like a garment; Like a cloak You will change them, and they will be changed. 27 But You are the same, and Your years will have no end. 28 The children of Your servants will continue, and their descendants will be established before You.” (Psalm 102:24–28, NKJV)

When spiritual enemies surround you, seeking your soul’s destruction, remember the eternal God who created the earth and the heavens. He continues forever, long after they perish. He is the One to trust for relief in the moment of trial. God’s unchanging nature assures He fulfills His eternal purposes for His servants and their children. He chastens His children through trials, to train and perfect our faith (Psalm 102:8-11; Hebrews 12:4-7). Still, He hears the cries of His people, and does not despise the prayers of those who set their hope on Him (Psalm 102:1-2, 17). His unending mercy abounds to His ceaseless praise (Psalm 102:18-22). The One who laid the foundations of the earth has established Zion (His church, Hebrews 12:22-23). He will establish you and sustain you through the temporary trials of the flesh, to deliver you to eternal glory.

Pray for those in Authority #832

Therefore I exhort first of all that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks be made for all men, for kings and all who are in authority, that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and reverence. (1 Timothy 2:1–2, NKJV)

It seems to be a universal pastime to complain about those who have authority over us. But, far from grumbling and carping against those who hold governmental authority over us, we are taught to pray for them. The decisions of kings and rulers have an influence on our lives, and the prayers of the righteous have influence with God. Therefore, Paul instructs us to give thanks and pray for conditions conducive to a quiet, peaceful life. Pray that we may freely express godliness and reverence without being hindered by faithless, evil people. The next time you feel an impulse to berate those in authority, try a different approach. Pray for them. Such will be far more beneficial than a verbal release of frustration that exposes you to ungodly attitudes and irreverent words.

Prayers Powerfully Answered #792

Now to Him who is able to do exceedingly abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that works in us (Ephesians 3:20, NKJV)

Although our petitions to God are often limited in scope and momentary in time, God is limitless in His ability to act on our behalf. God’s ability to answer our prayers is beyond measure, and is the very power that works in us (Eph. 3:17). Since Christ dwells in our hearts “through faith,” we can only conclude that God powerfully answers our prayers in harmony with His powerful word, which anchors our faith (Rom. 10:17). God’s word assures Christians that He works according to His will: “if we ask anything according to His will, He hears us…we have the petitions that we have asked of Him” (1 Jno. 5:14-15). Remember to whom you pray: there is none like Him. “Yours, O Lord, is the greatness, the power and the glory, the victory and the majesty; For all that is in heaven and in earth is Yours” (1 Chron. 29:11). God is able to powerfully answer our prayers far beyond our ability to ask or think. And so, like incense, our prayers confidently ascend before the throne of God (Rev. 8:3-4).

Prayers Night and Day #369

Now she who is really a widow, and left alone, trusts in God and continues in supplications and prayers night and day. (1 Timothy 5:5)

Prayer is the faithful expression of a Christian’s dependency upon God. The woman in our text was really a widow, with no child or grandchild to care for her (1 Tim. 5:4). For her, prayer was not optional, it was life-sustaining. She would not survive without God. How and why do you pray? Do you pray as if your life depends on God? Do you pray knowing that without God you would not survive? Or, do you pray as an occasional afterthought? Do not take God for granted. Let us “pray without ceasing”, knowing our life on earth and throughout eternity depends on God (1 Ths. 5:17).