Tag Archives: priority

The Narrow Gate #2437

13 Enter by the narrow gate; for wide is the gate and broad is the way that leads to destruction, and there are many who go in by it. 14 Because narrow is the gate and difficult is the way which leads to life, and there are few who find it (Matthew 7:13–14, NKJV).

Which path are you walking today? That depends on which gate you choose. One gate is wide, accommodating many, and puts you on the path leading to eternal destruction. The other gate is narrow with strict access and puts you on the path leading to eternal life. On another occasion, Jesus said we must “strive (endeavor, JRP) to enter through the narrow gate” to be saved (Luke 13:23-24). Jesus said many “will seek to enter and will not be able” (Luke 13:24). We conclude that desiring to be saved and being saved are not the same. Why not? Because effort is required. We must walk (live) the straitened path of kingdom righteousness (Matt. 7:14; 5:20; 6:33). The gospel call requires repentance, sacrifice, and conversion (Luke 6:46; Rom. 12:1-2). When many hear this, they refuse the narrow gate and confined way. Consider the rich young ruler who, in sorrow, turned away from following Jesus. He lacked one thing to have eternal life; He loved his wealth more than Jesus (Luke 18:18-23). He chose the wide gate and the broad way that leads to destruction. By contrast, saved ones make the kingdom of God their priority (Luke 18:24-29; Matt. 6:33). They enter the narrow gate, walk in the righteousness of the kingdom, and receive abundant spiritual blessings now and, finally, eternal life (Luke 18:30). So, which gate will you enter today? Where do you want to go? Jesus is the Way to eternal life (John 14:6).

Time Management #2829

35 Now in the morning, having risen a long while before daylight, He went out and departed to a solitary place; and there He prayed. 36 And Simon and those who were with Him searched for Him. 37 When they found Him, they said to Him, “Everyone is looking for You.” 38 But He said to them, “Let us go into the next towns, that I may preach there also, because for this purpose I have come forth.” 39 And He was preaching in their synagogues throughout all Galilee, and casting out demons (Mark 1:35–39, NKJV).

There were great demands on Jesus’s time. He came to the world to preach “the gospel of the kingdom of God” (Mark 1:38, 14-15). People gathered around Jesus to hear His teachings and be healed (Luke 5:15). His apostles needed personal training before going into the world to preach the gospel, so He taught them privately (Luke 9:10). Religious opponents pressed against Him to undermine Him and His work (Luke 11:53-54). He saw long days and short nights. Yet, Jesus took personal time for prayer and meditation (Mark 1:35; Luke 5:16; Matt. 14:13). He managed His time effectively, even when everyone was looking for Him. He set and kept priorities for how He used His time (in Mark 1:38, Jesus chose to go to “the next towns” to preach even as people searched for Him in Capernaum, Mark 1:21-34). We all have demands on our time as parents, children, employers, employees, etc. Like Jesus, remember your faith priorities each day without distraction. Take time to pray, read God’s word, meditate, and serve others (1 Tim. 4:13, 15). “Seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness… (Matt. 6:33).” Redeem your time with wisdom and faith (Eph. 5:15-17).

Seek First the Kingdom of God and His Righteousness #2339

31 “Therefore do not worry, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ 32 For after all these things the Gentiles seek. For your heavenly Father knows that you need all these things. 33 But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you” (Matthew 6:31–33, NKJV).

Jesus drives to the heart of the matter. When physical goals and concerns consume us, we start asking the wrong questions. Worry (anxious care) distracts us from God, who knows and supplies our needs. When we seek (crave intensely) physical needs (food, drink, and clothing) before and instead of spiritual needs (the kingdom of God and His righteousness), we are like the faithless Gentiles (those who have no hope and are without God in this world, Eph. 2:11-12). Our primary craving must be the rule and reign of God in our lives and righteousness by faith through the gospel of Christ. We trust God to give us the things that are necessary for our temporary journey on earth. At times we struggle to keep these spiritual priorities in place. The world presses us to conform to its values and expectations. Let us be strengthened in faith and trust the Lord to provide our daily bread as we live for eternal things that will not pass away (Ps. 37:25-26; 2 Cor. 4:17-18).

Commitment #2266

23 Then He said to them all, “If anyone desires to come after Me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross daily, and follow Me. 24 For whoever desires to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for My sake will save it. 25 For what profit is it to a man if he gains the whole world, and is himself destroyed or lost? 26 For whoever is ashamed of Me and My words, of him the Son of Man will be ashamed when He comes in His own glory, and in His Father’s, and of the holy angels (Luke 9:23–26, NKJV).

Commitment. Jesus had it and was committed to doing the Father’s will to the point of death (“lifted up” John 8:28-29). Early Christians had it, losing their lives rather than denying the Lord (Acts 7:59-60; 26:10). Christians who faced impending suffering were exhorted by Christ to “Be faithful unto death, and I will give you the crown of life” (Rev. 2:10). This directive helps us understand what it means to “deny himself, and take up his cross daily, and follow Me” (Luke 9:23). Even life itself must not be more precious to us than Jesus and doing His will. There is no benefit in gaining the whole world and forfeiting souls. Commitment to Christ eliminates being ashamed of Him and His words. We express faith that overcomes the world by our commitment to Christ (1 John 5:4). Commitment to Christ takes precedence over everyone and everything in the life of a disciple. May it be so with us today and each day that follows.

The Family of God #2243

19 Then His mother and brothers came to Him, and could not approach Him because of the crowd. 20 And it was told Him by some, who said, “Your mother and Your brothers are standing outside, desiring to see You.” 21 But He answered and said to them, “My mother and My brothers are these who hear the word of God and do it” (Luke 8:19–21, NKJV).

Jesus loved His family, honored His parents, and was an obedient son (Luke 2:51). He faced family dynamics, not unlike many have faced. When His brothers did not believe in Him, Jesus took time to teach them (John 7:1-8). On the cross, He arranged for his mother’s ongoing care, even as the pain intensified and death drew near (John 19:26-27). His statement on the occasion of today’s text was not an indictment against his fleshly family. Instead, He acknowledged the priority of His spiritual relationship with those who hear and do the word of God. Jesus repeatedly taught following Him and fellowship with Him takes priority over every other relationship (Matt. 10:37; Luke 14:25-26). Christians are children of God, and Christ is not ashamed to call us His brethren (Gal. 3:26-29; Heb. 2:11-13). Families arrange earthly inheritances, but the children of God have an eternal inheritance (Heb. 9:15; 1 Pet. 1:3-5). It is wonderful to spend time with our families. I wonder, do we desire to be with our spiritual family (those who hear the word of God and do it)? Do we love Jesus more than every other relationship?

Our Top Priority #2061

33 But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you. 34 Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about its own things. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble. (Matthew 6:33–34, NKJV)

Jesus said we must make the rule and reign of God and His righteousness the priority of our lives instead of the things of this world (Matthew 6:24-32). Daily priorities not only set what we pursue each day but also what we pursue our entire life. Priorities of a day turn into months, then months into years until finally, life ends. We are eager to set a lifetime goal of making God our top priority, yet we may fail to make Him and His will our priority each day. It is far easier to say Christ is a lifelong priority than to live that priority day by day (Luke 6:46; Matthew 7:21). How can we tell when we have fallen into this deception? By honestly assessing whether we are so worried and anxiously distracted by the troubles of each day that we push God’s rule and righteousness to the side (v. 34; Acts 24:25). When daily concerns are our most urgent priority, we are distracted and deterred from walking by faith. When that happens, God is no longer our priority. We are serving another master instead of the One who provides our daily bread and saves us eternally. Strengthen your faith and trust God every day. As your days turn into months and months into years, you will have eternal rest when death comes. (Sword Tips #1559, revised)

“I will follow You wherever You go.” #1959

18 And when Jesus saw great multitudes about Him, He gave a command to depart to the other side. 19 Then a certain scribe came and said to Him, “Teacher, I will follow You wherever You go.” 20 And Jesus said to him, “Foxes have holes and birds of the air have nests, but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay His head.” 21 Then another of His disciples said to Him, “Lord, let me first go and bury my father.” 22 But Jesus said to him, “Follow Me, and let the dead bury their own dead.” (Matthew 8:18–22, NKJV)

What price do you pay for following Jesus? When Jesus gave a command to His followers that He would leave Capernaum to cross the sea of Galilee, the scribe said he would follow Jesus “wherever You go.” We hope that he did. Jesus told him clearly that following Him would require sacrifice. It is easy to follow Jesus when no sacrifice is needed. But, when push comes to shove, and sacrifice becomes necessary, do you follow Him then? What about when there is a pressing need in your life? What priority informs and persuades your decision then? Jesus emphasized the proper priority when He said, “Let the dead bury their own dead.” Jesus must have first place in our decision-making process. We cannot say we will follow Jesus but then refuse to sacrifice to do so. We cannot say we will follow Jesus but then refuse to make following Him our top priority. Our everyday choices reveal both our sacrifice and our priority when it comes to following Jesus.

They Forsook All and Followed Him #1721

9 For he and all who were with him were astonished at the catch of fish which they had taken; 10 and so also were James and John, the sons of Zebedee, who were partners with Simon. And Jesus said to Simon, “Do not be afraid. From now on you will catch men.” 11 So when they had brought their boats to land, they forsook all and followed Him. (Luke 5:9–11, NKJV)

The carpenter told the fishermen where to cast their nets to catch fish. Like Peter, when the Master speaks, those who trust the Lord will follow His word. The miraculous catch of fish they hauled to shore prompted Peter to confess his sins to the Lord (Lk. 5:4-8). The fishermen were astonished and afraid, but Jesus eased their fears by assuring them of even greater catches to come. Peter, James, and John soon would be catching souls. The gospel these future apostles preached continues to capture lost souls by convicting sinners and converting them to Christ (Mk. 16:15-16; Lk. 24:46-48). These men set us a worthy example of immediate conviction, uncompromising priority, and sacrifice of faith in order to serve Jesus. When Jesus speaks, we must forsake all and follow Him (Lk. 14:33; 9:23).

Spiritual Apathy #1627

Because of laziness the building decays, and through idleness of hands the house leaks. (Ecclesiastes 10:18, NKJV)

Apathy is harmful to spiritual health and vitality. Apathy in this context is “an attitude of indifference and unconcern toward spiritual things. It generally ignores spiritual matters in order to place a greater emphasis on material things” (“What Is Wrong With Christian Apathy?,” Biblical Proof). Spiritual indifference is one of the besetting sins in our age of affluence, convenience, and leisure. Like ancient Israel, it is easy to become “at ease in Zion” and neglect “mercy, justice and faith” toward God and fellow human beings (Amos 6:1-6). Often generated by pride, it robs Christians of giving due time and attention to spiritual responsibilities and opportunities (Amos 6:7-8). We succumb to spiritual laziness when we are quick to address material concerns yet neglect our spiritual needs. Our hedge against spiritual apathy is to “seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you” (Matthew 6:33). Faith, activated by godly priorities to the will of God, helps guard against spiritual decay (see Romans 12:1-2).

Priorities #1559

33 But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you. 34 Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about its own things. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble. (Matthew 6:33–34, NKJV)

Jesus said we must make the rule and reign of God and His righteousness the priority of our lives instead of the things of this world (Matthew 6:24-32). Daily priorities not only set what we pursue each day, but also what we pursue our entire life. Priorities of the day turn into months, then months into years until finally, life ends. We are tempted to set a lifetime goal of making God our top priority, yet fail to genuinely make Him and His will our daily priority. It is far easier to say Christ is our lifelong priority than to live that priority day by day (Luke 6:46; Matthew 7:21). How can we tell when we have fallen into this deception? By honestly assessing whether we are so worried and anxiously distracted by the troubles of each day that God’s rule and righteousness are pushed to the side (v. 34; Acts 24:25). When daily concerns are our most urgent priority, they distract us and deter us from walking by faith. When that happens, God is not our priority. We are serving another master instead of the One who provides our daily bread and saves us eternally. Strengthen your faith and trust God every day, so that as your days turn into months and month into years, when death comes you will have eternal rest.