Tag Archives: reject

Reject a Factious Person #2430

9 But avoid foolish disputes, genealogies, contentions, and strivings about the law; for they are unprofitable and useless. 10 Reject a divisive man after the first and second admonition, 11 knowing that such a person is warped and sinning, being self-condemned (Titus 3:9–11, NKJV).

We need spiritual discernment to successfully identify and avoid foolish disputes, contentions, and strivings (v. 9; 1 Cor. 2:15; Phil. 1:9-10). Not every disagreement is about contending for the faith. Some are only about competing and maintaining one’s pride and position. Such are “unprofitable and useless” and fail to strengthen and stabilize souls. Striving over them causes “the ruin of the hearers” (2 Tim. 2:14; 1 Tim. 1:3-7). The divisive person is factious, choosing to disrupt unity instead of encouraging unity in Christ (cf. 1 Cor. 1:10-12). Sadly, this person rarely sees himself as “divisive” (Titus 3:10). So, we must have clear eyes to see the damage caused by the factious. They are perverted in faith and condemned by their divisive behavior (v. 11). Factiousness refuses the authority of Christ for self-defined constraints (binding where the Lord does not bind) or unscriptural allowances (loosing where the Lord binds). The factious press their distortions of truth through “selfish ambitions, dissensions, (and) heresies” (Gal. 5:20). Failure to identify and reject the factious person will infect and destroy a congregation. Therefore, if the factious refuse to repent, they must be marked and turned away from, not shielded and coddled in their sin (Rom. 16:17-18). Paul commanded Titus to reject them after a first and second warning (v. 10). We must do the same.

Hear Christ by Hearing His Messengers #2378

He who hears you hears Me, he who rejects you rejects Me, and he who rejects Me rejects Him who sent Me (Luke 10:16, NKJV).

Jesus empowered seventy disciples with miracles and a message when He sent them into cities ahead of Him (Luke 10:1, 9). Their message was, “The kingdom of God has come near to you,” and their miracles certified its validity (Luke 10:17-20). Therefore, those who rejected them and their message rejected Jesus and the Father who sent Him. (Necessarily, the converse would also be true. To receive them and their message would be to receive Jesus and His Father, John 13:20.) Judgment without mercy would descend on the city that refused Christ’s message and messengers (Luke 10:11-15). This reality warns us not to “refuse Him who speaks” to us today (Heb. 12:25). God speaks to us by His Son, who sent out His apostles with His gospel of salvation (Heb. 1:1-2; 2:1-4; Matt. 28:18-20). We cannot discount and discard the apostles’ teachings in the inspired Scriptures and have any expectation of God’s approval (1 Cor. 14:37; 2 Tim. 3:16-17). I recently read a report that almost 40% of those surveyed think a person who does not believe in God can (will) go to heaven. Yet, “If the righteous one is scarcely saved, where will the ungodly and the sinner appear” (1 Pet. 4:18)? Unbelievers do not go to heaven but hell (Rev. 21:8). Christ calls us to receive His word and follow Him. Then we will be received by Him (Acts 2:36-42).

Shake Off the Dust #1772

8 “Whatever city you enter, and they receive you, eat such things as are set before you. 9 And heal the sick there, and say to them, ‘The kingdom of God has come near to you.’ 10 But whatever city you enter, and they do not receive you, go out into its streets and say, 11 ‘The very dust of your city which clings to us we wipe off against you. Nevertheless know this, that the kingdom of God has come near you.’ 12 But I say to you that it will be more tolerable in that Day for Sodom than for that city.” (Luke 10:8–12, NKJV)

Jesus sent out seventy disciples to places He was about to go (Lk. 10:1). They were to heal the sick and preach the kingdom of God (Lk. 9:60; 10:9). Some would receive them and their message, while others would not (Lk. 10:5-7). By explaining what to do and what to expect, Jesus also gave them a reason not to be discouraged when a city rejected the gospel of the kingdom. He taught them there is a point at which the messenger is relieved of responsibility and the hearer is held accountable. Shaking off the dust of the city was a symbolic gesture that testified against the city for rejecting the gospel. They, not the messengers, would be held accountable (Lk. 9:5; Acts 18:6). The gospel teacher is not innocent when the truth is not faithfully preached (Acts 20:26). Such a failure does not excuse the sinner (Ezek. 3:16-21). But, when truth is taught and it is refused, the full weight of accountability on Judgment Day will fall on those who refused to hear and obey God (Lk. 10:12).