Tag Archives: soul

“He Spoke This Parable” #2246

1 Then all the tax collectors and the sinners drew near to Him to hear Him. 2 And the Pharisees and scribes complained, saying, “This Man receives sinners and eats with them.” 3 So He spoke this parable to them, saying: (Luke 15:1–3, NKJV).

Simply put, a parable is an illustration of divine truth. The illustration is taken from ordinary life events, from which the spiritual lesson is drawn. Greek dictionaries define a “parable” (parabole) as “a similitude…fictitious narrative (of common life conveying a moral)” (Strong’s, G3850). Understanding the parables depends on the condition of one’s heart. Jesus explained this in the parable of the soils, which He said is key to understanding the parables (Mark 4:13, 14-20). An open, honest heart receives its meaning, holds it fast, and bears good fruit (Luke 8:9-10, 15). Hard, closed hearts do not receive God’s word and fail to understand and apply the parables of the Lord (Matt. 13:10-22). In today’s passage, the scribes and Pharisees complained against Jesus for receiving and eating with sinners. They distorted the truth of the matter. The sinners came to Jesus to hear Him teach. He did not endorse their sins; just the opposite. He taught them the way of God in truth to save them. Jesus answered His critics with three parables. God is compassionate toward sinners (Luke 15:4-7), God values each and every soul (Lk. 15:8-10), and God mercifully forgives sinners who repent and return to Him (Luke 15:11-24). Like the elder son, the complainers were ungrateful of their blessings and unmerciful toward sinners (Lk. 15:25-32). Powerful lessons for those who have “ears to hear” (Matt. 13:9).

Lost and Found #2210

8 “Or what woman, having ten silver coins, if she loses one coin, does not light a lamp, sweep the house, and search carefully until she finds it? 9 And when she has found it, she calls her friends and neighbors together, saying, ‘Rejoice with me, for I have found the piece which I lost!’ 10 Likewise, I say to you, there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner who repents.” (Luke 15:8–10, NKJV)

I lost a key this morning, a pretty important one. I don’t have nine others, only the one. Frantically searching, I turned on a lamp, looked in drawers, and under every place I could think they might be. Unlike the woman in this passage, I did not find the lost key. So, I can appreciate her joy when she found the lost coin. But of course, her gladness over finding the lost coin illustrates heaven’s joy over one sinner who repents (v. 10). I lost track of that key, and now it is gone. Thankfully, God never loses track of people. They may choose to leave the Lord instead of remaining with Him (see the parable of the prodigal son, Lk. 15:11-24). But God is always looking for lost souls. He does not want one soul to perish. He is longsuffering toward us, granting us time and opportunity to repent (2 Pet. 3:9; cf. 1 Tim. 2:4). Never think you cannot be “found” and saved by the Lord (1 Tim. 1:15-16). His gospel has great power to free you from the shackles and death of sin when you believe, repent, confess your faith, and are baptized for the remission of sins (Rom. 1:16; Mk. 16:15-16; Acts 2:38; 3:19; 10:34-35). Keep looking for lost souls, and rejoice with heaven when souls are saved.

“I Will Give You Rest” #2192

Come to Me, all you who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. (Matthew 11:28, NKJV)

Labor produces weariness. Since sin entered the world, the “thorns and thistles” of the cursed soil have been beaten back by the sweat of the brow (Gen. 3:17-19). Indeed, “the sleep of a laboring man is sweet” (Eccl. 5:12). Jesus sees us toiling against an even greater curse, that of sin and death. Sin weighs upon the soul, crushing out the light of God’s presence and suffocating our spiritual breath under its heavy load. Jesus sees us failing to make headway against sin. We do not have the strength to break its bonds and free ourselves from its captivity. Its shroud of death confines us in darkness (Rom. 6:23; 3:23). Jesus knows our suffering, our pain, our distress in sin. He offers relief, repose, and refreshment for our souls. Living water is available that forever quenches the parched heart yearning for life (Jno. 4:10, 13-14; Isa. 55:1-7). Jesus can save you from sin’s eternal turmoil, pain, and death (Acts 4:12). Come to Jesus, and He will give rest to your soul (Matt. 11:29). Be saved from your sins by believing He is the Son of God and obeying Him in faith (Jno. 1:12; Mk. 16:15-16; Heb. 5:8-9).

“Am I worth saving?” Yes! #2037

8 “Or what woman, having ten silver coins, if she loses one coin, does not light a lamp, sweep the house, and search carefully until she finds it? 9 And when she has found it, she calls her friends and neighbors together, saying, ‘Rejoice with me, for I have found the piece which I lost!’ 10 Likewise, I say to you, there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner who repents.” (Luke 15:8–10, NKJV)

Do you ever feel like you are beyond saving? Like your sins are so many, so frequent, so powerful over you that you say to yourself, “God could never forgive me!” If so, then listen to the parable of the lost coin very carefully. You are valuable to God! He is looking for you! He wants to find you! He is willing and able to forgive you from the storehouse of His mercy and compassion (see Lk. 15:1-7; Eph. 2:1-10). Image if you lost one-tenth of your money. Wouldn’t you look for it diligently and rejoice when you found it? God is like that. He values every sinner. He does not look for sinners so He can condemn us, but so He can save us. The real question is not whether God can save you; it is, “Do I want to be saved?” “Do I want to live differently?” “Do I want to have the sure hope of eternal life?” Earnest faith, repentance toward God from a contrite heart, baptism into the death of His Son, and a life devoted to following Jesus are what God wants from every sinner (Jno. 8:23-24; Acts 17:30; Rom. 6:3-4; Jno. 8:12). You are valuable to God. Value yourself, put your faith in Jesus Christ, and follow Him. He will save you.

“I Pray That You May Prosper” #2014

1 The Elder, To the beloved Gaius, whom I love in truth: 2 Beloved, I pray that you may prosper in all things and be in health, just as your soul prospers. (3 John 1–2, NKJV)

John, now the aged apostle, expressed a three-fold love of Gaius, which was no doubt prompted by the disciple’s faithful walk in the truth (3 John 3-4). John’s love for Gaius prompted prayer for his health and prosperity “in all things” as his soul prospered. Is this proof of the “prosperity gospel” that many preach? Hardly. The word “prosper” contains the idea of progress, of “help on the road,” and thereby to successfully reach one’s destination (Strong, G2137). Gaius’ spiritual life was progressing – he was on a spiritual journey. (So are we, 1 Peter 2:11.) John prayed that his health and all things would progress well, too. Christ did not mandate material abundance as evidence of spiritual fullness. Indeed, the Son of Man did not have a place to lay His head (Matt. 8:20). Far from covetous enrichment for selfish pursuits, the gospel teaches material wealth is a blessing that gives opportunities and the spiritual responsibility to be “rich in good works, ready to give, willing to share,” and to do so thankfully (1 Tim. 6:17-19). Gaius was undoubtedly doing these very things when he hospitably supported faithful workers for the truth (3 John 5-8). May our souls faithfully progress on our pilgrimage with the health and the means to do the work our hands find to do “while it is day,” for “the night is coming when no one can work” (John 9:4).

“Just As Your Soul Prospers” #1883

2 Beloved, I pray that you may prosper in all things and be in health, just as your soul prospers. 3 For I rejoiced greatly when brethren came and testified of the truth that is in you, just as you walk in the truth. 4 I have no greater joy than to hear that my children walk in truth. (3 John 2–4, NKJV)

John prayed Gaius’ physical health would match his spiritual health. How did John know Gaius’ soul was progressing successfully? Faithful brethren had told John of his beloved Gaius’ spiritual fitness. They reported the truth was in Gaius and that he walked in the truth (v. 3). Therefore, John concluded his soul prospered because Gaius believed and lived by the truth. One is not spiritually healthy when he or she does not abide in the word (truth) of Christ (Jno. 8:31-32). So, using this biblical standard, can it be said that your soul prospers? Is the truth of God in you? Are you walking in the truth? If so, the answer is “yes.” If not, the answer is “no.” God’s truth brings spiritual prosperity when we receive it and walk in it. John’s joy was made full by hearing his children (in the gospel, 1 Cor. 4:15) walked in truth. Faithful discipleship cannot exist when the truth is not in us and our deeds are not in harmony with it. Apply John’s prayer to yourself. If your physical health matched your spiritual health, how healthy would you be? When you answer these questions, “Is the truth in you?” and, “Are you walking in the truth?,” you will have the Bible answer to the state of your spiritual health.

Deposit Your Soul to God #1856

Therefore let those who suffer according to the will of God commit their souls to Him in doing good, as to a faithful Creator. (1 Peter 4:19, NKJV)

Not all suffering is equal. Sometimes suffering is deserved. The apostle Paul once said if he had committed anything worthy of death, he did not object to dying (Acts 25:11). He would accept the suffering that comes from being guilty of evil (Rom. 13:4). Peter had just warned against sins that bring suffering, “But let none of you suffer as a murderer, a thief, an evildoer, or as a busybody in other people’s matters” (1 Pet. 4:15). At other times, one can “suffering wrongfully” “because of conscience toward God” (1 Pet. 2:19). Suffering can happen through no fault of your own, and because of your faith in Christ (1 Pet. 2:18; 4:12-16). When we suffer “according to the will of God” we are able to endure it by committing our souls to God. The word “commit” means to deposit (for protection), as one deposits money into a bank for safekeeping. How do we deposit our souls to God for protection? By “doing good” (1 Pet. 4:19). God is trustworthy to safeguard our souls as we “maintain good works” (Tit. 3:8; do His will, Matt. 7:21). God does not say He will remove the suffering, but that He will protect us as we go through it. Dedicate yourself to keep on doing what is good and right when you suffer for following the will of God. By doing so, you are depositing your soul to the faithful Creator, who will keep it safe long after the suffering has past (1 Pet. 5:10-11).

Hear, Heed, and Humble #1837

31 The ear that hears the rebukes of life will abide among the wise. 32 He who disdains instruction despises his own soul, but he who heeds rebuke gets understanding. 33 The fear of the Lord is the instruction of wisdom, and before honor is humility. (Proverbs 15:31–33, NKJV)

When these proverbs are combined they give us good insight into developing and living in wisdom. First, we must accept the rebukes of life (v. 31). There are lessons to be learned from the school of hard knocks. Life’s ups and downs will teach us wisdom – if we will hear them. Otherwise, we foolishly continue to repeat the same mistakes. Secondly, redirecting our lives through instructive rebukes means we care our about our own soul (v. 32). Understanding comes from accepting wise instruction. Unfortunately, pride and selfishness will prevent us from learning and heeding the rebukes of life, as well as the rebukes contained in God’s inspired word (2 Tim. 3:16-17; Matt. 16:26). Thirdly, when we couple fear (reverence) of God with humility we will gain wisdom and its honor (v. 33). Jesus repeatedly said only by humbling ourselves will we be exalted (Lk. 14:11; 18:14; Matt. 23:12). God gives grace to the humble, but He resists the proud (Jas. 4:6). Let us humble ourselves to hear the rebukes of life (v. 31). Let us reverence God and properly value the life He gives us (v. 32). And let us fear God, receive His wise teaching, and humbly do His will (v. 33). God will come in due time if we will hear, heed and humble ourselves before Him (1 Pet. 5:6).

Good News from a Far Country #1527

As cold water to a weary soul, so is good news from a far country. (Proverbs 25:25, NKJV)

Good news lightens the heart and refreshes the soul. Like cold water in the heat of the day, good news revives us within. The good news of Jesus Christ (the best news of all) does more than temporarily refresh us, it sustains our souls unto eternity. From heaven’s throne the gospel of redemption has been revealed to and preached by the apostles of Jesus Christ (Galatians 1:11-12). God speaks to us in His Son by their word (John 13:20; Mark 16:15; Hebrews 1:1-2; 2 Timothy 3:16-17). How satisfying God’s word is to the thirsty soul – living water springing up into everlasting life (John 4:10-14)! The news of the gospel working to save the lost and to transform lives is wondrous news. Do not be overwhelmed when some refuse the gospel. Instead, remember others are being saved by the same gospel. Listen for the news of their salvation and be invigorated in your faith. Let us take heart and be revived by the good news that comes from heaven.

“Your faith has made you well” #1139

20 And suddenly, a woman who had a flow of blood for twelve years came from behind and touched the hem of His garment. 21 For she said to herself, “If only I may touch His garment, I shall be made well.” 22 But Jesus turned around, and when He saw her He said, “Be of good cheer, daughter; your faith has made you well.” And the woman was made well from that hour. (Matthew 9:20–22, NKJV)

The miracles that Jesus worked proved His claim that He is the Messiah (Matt. 9:1-8). Just as the faith of the paralytic and those who helped him produced the forgiveness of sins in Matthew 9:2, Matthew now records for us that Christ’s miracles of healing were, at times, responses to the faith of the infirmed. It was her faith that made her whole. The healing of the soul is what Jesus promises the whole world, through faith in Him (Mk. 16:15-16; Gal. 3:26-29; Rom. 6:1-4). Many folks are waiting for a miracle to heal their body’s illness. That is not the promised power of the gospel (Rom. 1:16-17). Its power heals the sin-sick soul. Your body will die and perish. But, your spirit is immortal. Go to Jesus in faith, submitting to His will. He will heal your soul (Matt. 11:28-30).