Tag Archives: thank

In the Beginning #2155

In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. (Genesis 1:1, NKJV)

Beginnings. Every New Year’s Day, people worldwide reflect on the previous year and resolve what they will do during our next 365-circuit around the sun. It is a perfect moment to remember who created the heavens and the earth and, therefore, time itself. With the precision that defies random chance, the earth sits on its tilted axis, rotating to produce night and day (not to mention gravity). This well-arranged order also gives the earth its seasons, protecting us from the sun’s otherwise harmful and deadly effects while sustaining plant, animal, and human life. God did that (Gen. 1; Psa. 33:6-9; Jer. 51:15-16). The hubris of humanity dares to think humans control this globe. God said to Job, “Have you commanded the morning since your days began, and caused the dawn to know its place” (Job 38:12)? We neither control the morning light nor the dark of night; God does. How foolish it is to think humans control the heavens and the earth! “Where were you when I laid the foundations of the earth? Tell Me, if you have understanding. Who determined its measurements? Surely you know! Or who stretched the line upon it? To what were its foundations fastened? Or who laid its cornerstone, When the morning stars sang together, and all the sons of God shouted for joy” (Job 38:4-7)? Pause as another year begins to give thanks to God, our Creator, and Sustainer. Thank God for your life, and especially for the life He gives you in Christ (Rom. 6:23). There is no better beginning to your new year.

Thank God Always #425

We are bound to thank God always for you, brethren, as it is fitting, because your faith grows exceedingly, and the love of every one of you all abounds toward each other, 4  so that we ourselves boast of you among the churches of God for your patience and faith in all your persecutions and tribulations that you endure” (2 Thessalonians 1:3-4)

The apostle expresses two reasons for being thankful to God for the Christians in Thessalonica. First, he viewed himself under moral obligation to do so; he was duty bound to be thankful. Secondly, it was entirely proper to do so because of their evident faith and brotherly love that endured and grew in the face of “persecutions and tribulations”. Joined with Paul’s thanksgiving to God was his ready endorsement of the brethren to the churches. Our lesson is simply, yet clear. We are to be thankful for our brethren because it is the right thing to do. And especially when their lives exhibit worthy examples for us and others. “In everything give thanks” must constantly govern our attitude toward God and His children (1 Thess. 5:18).