Tag Archives: wisdom

“Those Who Make Peace” #2298

17 Repay no one evil for evil. Have regard for good things in the sight of all men. 18 If it is possible, as much as depends on you, live peaceably with all men” (Romans 12:17–18, NKJV).

The gospel forbids retaliation and taking personal vengeance. To do so disrespects God and His righteous vengeance against evildoers: “Beloved, do not avenge yourselves, but rather give place to wrath; for it is written, ‘Vengeance is Mine, I will repay,’ says the Lord” (Rom. 12:19). Therefore, Christians are to overcome evil with good by doing all we can to live peaceably with others (Rom. 12:21). We can seek peace and pursue it (1 Pet. 3:10-11; Heb. 12:14). For example, the carnally minded say, “I’ll never make peace with him because he wronged me.” But Christians are to be peacemakers, not conflict promoters (Matt. 5:9). The carnally minded say, “I’ll get even with him.” But Christians turn the other cheek instead of retaliating in kind (Matt. 5:38-42). The carnally minded say, “He wronged me once, and I’ll never trust him again.” But Christians forgive as God in Christ forgave us (Eph. 4:31-32). To be a peacemaker takes self-control, sacrifice, and selflessness. Wisdom from above is peaceable because it is “pure” and “willing to yield, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality and without hypocrisy” (James 3:17). Peace does not happen on its own. Peacemakers wisely sow “the fruit of righteousness” to “make peace” (James 3:18; Matt. 5:9).

Enlightened Eyes #2295

17 that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give to you the spirit of wisdom and revelation in the knowledge of Him, 18 the eyes of your understanding being enlightened; that you may know what is the hope of His calling, what are the riches of the glory of His inheritance in the saints, 19 and what is the exceeding greatness of His power toward us who believe, according to the working of His mighty power (Ephesians 1:17–19, NKJV).

Paul’s prayer for the Ephesian Christians was specific, praying God would give them “the spirit of wisdom and revelation in the knowledge of Him” (v. 17). Paul wanted them to have insight (“the spirit of wisdom”) and understanding in knowing God by His revelation of truth (cf. Eph. 3:3-4). Paul prayed that they would grasp an appreciation of the spiritual blessings derived through the wisdom of knowing God and His revelation. He describes this as “the eyes of your understanding being enlightened (v. 18). Divine revelation lights our way with truth (John 8:12, 31-32). With a spirit or mind of wisdom to follow His revelation, we obtain spiritual blessings that include: (1) Knowing the hope of His calling (v. 18). The gospel hope of rest and resurrection is central to the gospel (Matt. 11:28; 1 Cor. 15:19-20). (2) Knowing the riches of God’s inheritance in the saints (v. 18). In Christ, we share present spiritual riches and, finally, eternal life (cf. Mark 10:29-30; 1 Pet. 1:4-5). (3) Knowing the exceeding greatness of God’s power toward believers (v. 19). God’s power raised Jesus and works in us, His church, to achieve God’s purposes when we do His will (Eph. 1:20-23; 3:17, 20; Phil. 2:12-13). May God be glorified “in the church by Christ Jesus” for such wonderful spiritual blessings (Eph. 3:21; 1:3).

Listening to Wisdom #2291

34 “Blessed is the man who listens to me, watching daily at my gates, waiting at the posts of my doors. 35 For whoever finds me finds life, and obtains favor from the Lord; 36 But he who sins against me wrongs his own soul; All those who hate me love death” (Proverbs 8:34–36, NKJV).

Wisdom cries out, offering her blessings of prudence, knowledge, discretion, counsel, understanding, and strength to those who will listen to her (Prov. 8:1, 12-14). Consider some necessary traits that help us listen to wisdom’s instructions. (1) We must fear God. “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and the knowledge of the Holy One is understanding” (Prov. 9:10). Only when we fear God are we willing to listen to wisdom’s guidance. (2) We must receive the word of God. “For the Lord gives wisdom; From His mouth come knowledge and understanding” (Prov. 2:6). God’s word is the wellspring of wisdom, knowledge, and understanding. Yet too often, we turn from it to human teachings and counsel (Col. 2:8). By doing so, we sin against our souls, hate wisdom, and love death (Prov. 8:36). (3) We must live as God instructs us. “He stores up sound wisdom for the upright; He is a shield to those who walk uprightly” (Prov. 2:7). Divine instruction and its wisdom do us no good if we do not apply them. Wisdom calls on us to follow the truth of God. Wisdom says, “My mouth will speak truth,” and “all the worlds of my mouth are with righteousness” (Prov. 8:7). The blessings of wisdom come to those who fear God, receive His word, and obey what He says (James 3:13-18).

The Multitude of Words #2287

In the multitude of words sin is not lacking, but he who restrains his lips is wise (Proverbs 10:19, NKJV).

Unrestrained words lead to foolishness, sin, and sorrow. The wisdom of restraining our tongues is reiterated by James, “So then, my beloved brethren, let every man be swift to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath; for the wrath of man does not produce the righteousness of God” (James 1:19-20). Consider some of the sins that arise when one is captured by “the multitude of words.” (1) The sin of pride in one’s eloquence. Although we are confident the apostle Paul had command of rhetoric and eloquence, he made it a point not to parade such abilities when preaching the gospel (1 Cor. 2:1-5). Likewise, while eloquent, Apollos drew attention to the Scriptures and not himself (Acts 18:24-25). His humility prepared him to learn the way of God more accurately (Acts 18:26). Pride enters in when we try to impress others with many words. (2) The sin of misguided prayers. Jesus said, “And when you pray, do not use vain repetitions as the heathen do. For they think that they will be heard for their many words” (Matt. 6:7). God’s attention is not gained by many words but by a contrite heart (Luke 18:13-14). God is not impressed by the multitude of words. After all, He made man’s mouth (Exod. 4:11). (3) The sin of foolishness. Wisdom advances righteousness and avoids evil by knowing when to speak and when to be silent (Eccl. 3:7). Fools spread slanderous insinuations, rushing headlong to their destruction, but “wisdom is found on the lips of him who has understanding” (Prov. 10:18, 14, 13).

Seeking and Finding Wisdom #2245

6 A scoffer seeks wisdom and does not find it, but knowledge is easy to him who understands. 7 Go from the presence of a foolish man, when you do not perceive in him the lips of knowledge. 8 The wisdom of the prudent is to understand his way, but the folly of fools is deceit. 9 Fools mock at sin, but among the upright there is favor (Proverbs 14:6–9, NKJV).

The path to hell is paved with the foolishness and self-deception of human wisdom (1 Cor. 1:18-25; 3:18-20). This age’s rhetoric promotes the superiority of human knowledge and insight while demoting faith to a blind leap into the unknown (which is entirely wrong, Heb. 11:1). The truth is, many things people once considered to be true have been proven false. The earth is not flat. The earth is not the center of the universe. Bleeding a patient does not increase health. But the scoffer refuses to be humble. He keeps looking for wisdom, and it keeps eluding him (v. 6). Wise Solomon counsels us to avoid the foolish who mock at sin and deal in lies. Knowledge and wisdom begin with the fear of the Lord (Prov. 1:7; 9:10). When we stop fearing God, we expose ourselves to the world’s foolishness and the sin that deceives and destroys us. God’s word stands the test of things “falsely called knowledge” – do not be deceived (1 Tim. 6:20-21). May we all “Buy the truth, and do not sell it, also wisdom and instruction and understanding” (Prov. 23:23).

“Be Wise as Serpents and harmless as Doves” #2236

Behold, I send you out as sheep in the midst of wolves. Therefore be wise as serpents and harmless as doves (Matthew 10:16, NKJV).

Before Jesus sent His apostles into all the world to preach the gospel to every creature, He sent them on a limited commission to “the lost sheep of the house of Israel” (Matt. 10:5-6). Their message then was that “the kingdom of heaven is at hand” (Matt. 10:7). They would need the wisdom of serpents and the innocence of doves to accomplish their mission. Both traits are still necessary for Christians who live “in the midst of “a crooked and perverse generation” (Phil. 2:15). Consider the snake’s wisdom. (1) Snakes are aware of their surroundings. They are artfully in their pursuit of prey. We need to use heavenly wisdom as we try to seek and save the lost with the gospel (James 3:13, 17-18; 2 Tim. 2:23-26). (2) Snakes have heightened senses. The keen senses of a snake alert it to potential danger and its next meal. Christians must be wise about their moral and spiritual surroundings to avoid sin and partake of spiritual nourishment (1 Cor. 15:33; Heb. 5:12-14; 10:24-25). Consider the dove’s harmlessness. (1) Doves signify the innocence of a character. They glide gracefully through the air harming no one. Even so, Christians are to be innocent of guile (1 Pet. 2:21-22). (2) Doves signify the innocence of pure motives. Doves fly without malice; they are not predators. Doves were the humble offering of the poor at the Jewish temple (Lk. 2:22-24). Likewise, let us be pure in heart and humble in spirit toward all (Matt. 5:8). Our spiritual protection as sheep among wolves is wisdom and innocence.

Prayer, Providence, and Open Doors

2 Continue earnestly in prayer, being vigilant in it with thanksgiving; 3 meanwhile praying also for us, that God would open to us a door for the word, to speak the mystery of Christ, for which I am also in chains, 4 that I may make it manifest, as I ought to speak. 5 Walk in wisdom toward those who are outside, redeeming the time. 6 Let your speech always be with grace, seasoned with salt, that you may know how you ought to answer each one. (Colossians 4:2–6, NKJV)

Paul urged Christians to rely on the power of prayer and divine providence to spread the gospel. Thankful hearts are alert to blessings from God’s hand (v. 2). Trusting in God’s foresight and provisions, we pray for open doors (access, opportunity) for God’s word to reach hearts and lives. We pray for those who walk through those doors and teach others (3). Paul relied on brethren praying for him.  Although in prison, he yearned for their prayers so that he (and they) would use wisdom in speaking the gospel to the lost. While God opens doors for the gospel, we must be wise, prudent, and gracious in choosing our words. Time is precious, so use it properly. Doors of spiritual opportunity are too often closed by impulsive words and unwise actions. So, let us work on aligning our motive (“to answer each one”) with well-placed, gracious words of truth. When we do, we trust God will work through us for His glory (Phil. 2:12-13).

Truth or Consequences #2131

10 Now therefore, be wise, O kings; Be instructed, you judges of the earth. 11 Serve the Lord with fear, and rejoice with trembling. 12 Kiss the Son, lest He be angry, and you perish in the way, when His wrath is kindled but a little. Blessed are all those who put their trust in Him. (Psalm 2:10–12, NKJV)

The psalmist counsels the kings and rulers of the earth to be wise, accept instruction, serve the Lord God with reverent joy, and worship the Son. This course of conduct stands in sharp relief to their futile fight against God and His Christ (Psa. 2:1-3). Wisdom, instruction, reverent service, and joyful worship are necessary traits of trusting Christ (v. 12). King Solomon observed, “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and the knowledge of the Holy One is understanding” (Prov. 9:10). Reverent humility accepts God’s instruction, but pride promotes ignorance. Honoring Christ the King with obedient service is the essence of trusting Him. He sees and blesses such trust in Him. By contrast, obstinate opposition to Christ kindles His righteous wrath (v. 12). The rulers and judges of the earth continue to reap what they sow, and so do we (Gal. 6:7-8). Worship the Son and be blessed or fight against Him, stir up His anger, and be punished.

Teach Us To Number Our Days #2104

1 Lord, You have been our dwelling place in all generations. 2 Before the mountains were brought forth, or ever You had formed the earth and the world, even from everlasting to everlasting, You are God. 3 You turn man to destruction, And say, “Return, O children of men.” 4 For a thousand years in Your sight are like yesterday when it is past, and like a watch in the night. (Psalm 90:1–4, NKJV)

Daylight Savings Time ended last night. We manipulate the clock, attempting to improve the human condition. Scripture teaches us God peers into the ebb and flow of time from His timeless, eternal throne. He is unhindered by the limitations of time; He is God “from everlasting to everlasting.” God created time for human survival (days and seasons), and with it, we measure our existence (Gen. 1:14-18; Psa. 90:10). There was a “beginning,” and there will be an “end” of earthly time (Gen. 1:1; 1 Cor. 15:24). When we are reflective, time teaches us “to number our days, that we may gain a heart of wisdom,” because “it is appointed for men to die once, but after this the judgment” (Psa. 90:12; Heb. 9:27). While God is not defined and detained by time, we are. Time teaches us our mortality, our fragility (Psa. 39:4-6). Our life is “a vapor that appears for a little time and then vanishes away” (Jas. 4:14; Psa. 90:3). Time is a precious commodity. Use today to honor God by walking carefully and wisely because the days are evil (Eph. 5:15-16). “Oh, satisfy us early with Your mercy, that we may rejoice and be glad all our days!” (Psa. 90:14)

Ignorance is not Bliss #2083

2 Also it is not good for a soul to be without knowledge, and he sins who hastens with his feet. 3 The foolishness of a man twists his way, and his heart frets against the Lord. (Proverbs 19:2–3, NKJV)

I grew up hearing that “ignorance is bliss.” Maybe you did, too. Sometimes it was said somewhat sarcastically to warn us against thinking it is true. But sometimes I heard it said to justify choosing a particular (usually foolish) course of action. After all, we frequently hear people say, “I didn’t know” to explain something they did or did not do. We have most likely used that line, too. The Bible does not teach ignorance is bliss; just the opposite. Solomon said a lack of knowledge propels us into doing dangerous things that lead to sin (v. 2). To think ignorance is bliss and then act without understanding puts us on a twisted path (v. 3). When trouble comes due to our foolish choices, many get angry at God for the problem. The remedy is to accept instruction from the Lord and gain knowledge and wisdom (Prov. 1:1-6). Solomon said, “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge, but fools despise wisdom and instruction” (Prov. 1:7). Bliss comes from revering God, not getting angry at Him. When we respect God, we can “grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ” (2 Pet. 3:18). By doing so, our feet will not run to sin but walk the path that leads to life (Matt. 7:13-14).