Praise Christ for His Actions Toward Us #1328

5 and from Jesus Christ, the faithful witness, the firstborn from the dead, and the ruler over the kings of the earth. To Him who loved us and washed us from our sins in His own blood, 6 and has made us kings and priests to His God and Father, to Him be glory and dominion forever and ever. Amen.” (Revelation 1:5–6, NKJV)

Majestic attributions are given Jesus Christ in verse 5 (faithful witness, firstborn from the dead, and ruler of kings). Then, John draws our attention to Christ’s actions toward us. First, Jesus “loved us” (v. 5). The full expression of His love is witnessed in His cruel death of suffering and sorrow, the just for the unjust, to bring us to God (1 Peter 3:18: John 15:13). Second, Jesus “washed us from our sins in His own blood” (v. 5). God does His work of redemption when the sinner is baptized into Christ’s death. It is in this action of faith that His saving blood cleanses sins (Romans 6:3; Acts 22:16; Colossians 2:12). (Only baptism puts sinners into the death of Jesus, Romans 6:3.) Third, Jesus “made us kings and priests to His God and Father” (v. 6). Every Christian is a priest who offers spiritual sacrifices of service and praise to God (1 Peter 2:5; Hebrews 13:15). Christians compose the church, Christ’s kingdom (a “royal priesthood” and a “holy nation,” 1 Peter 2:9). Christians share in the blessings of Christ’s kingdom now, while expecting entrance into the everlasting kingdom of the Lord (Colossians 1:13; 2 Peter 1:10-11). As so, we praise and honor Jesus Christ, “to Him be glory and dominion forever and ever. Amen.”


“As you have received Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk in Him” #1327

6 As you therefore have received Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk in Him, 7 rooted and built up in Him and established in the faith, as you have been taught, abounding in it with thanksgiving. (Colossians 2:6–7, NKJV)

As used here, “received” means “to receive near…to associate with oneself” (Strong’s Dictionary). Christians have a close association with Christ. This relation began with belief: “He came to His own, and His own did not receive Him. But as many as received Him, to them He gave the right to become children of God, to those who believe in His name” (John 1:11-12). Those who believe in Christ are given the right to become children of God. Receiving Christ begins with belief, but it does not end there. Jesus clearly said, “He who believes and is baptized will be saved: but he who does not believe will be condemned” (Mark 16:16). To receive Christ (take Him near, to be saved) one must believe and be baptized into Christ (Galatians 3:26-27). Through obedient faith, one receives Christ and His salvation (Acts 2:38-41). Christians need a grounded and growing faith to continue to walk in Christ (Colossians 2:7). The teaching of the apostles establishes us in the faith (Acts 2:42). Having heard, believed and obeyed the word of salvation to receive Christ, our hearts were filled with thanksgiving. Now, to remain close to Christ, we must continue to live with an obedient, vibrant faith.

Apostolic Authority #1326

For even if I should boast somewhat more about our authority, which the Lord gave us for edification and not for your destruction, I shall not be ashamed— (2 Corinthians 10:8, NKJV)

Are you ashamed of Bible authority? Have you grown tired of establishing Bible authority for all you say and do by the commandments, apostolic examples and necessary inferences of the New Testament (Colossians 3:17; Acts 15:7-19)? If so, please accept this gentle reminder that without heaven’s authority for our words and deeds, we do not have heaven’s approval (see Matthew 21:23-27). Jesus Christ possesses all authority (right to rule) in heaven and on earth (Matthew 28:18). He reveals and exercises His authority over us through His word (John 12:48-50). Only when we live according to His truth are we truly His disciples (John 8:31-32; 14:6; 17:17). The apostles of Jesus spoke and wrote His authoritative word for our benefit (1 Corinthians 14:37). Paul was not ashamed of the authority he had as an apostle of Christ. Nor did Paul abuse his authority. Apostolic authority edifies all who submit to it. Spiritual growth in Christ (edification) occurs by following the apostles’ doctrine, not the doctrines of men (Acts 2:42). Who is authorizing what you say and do: heaven, or men?

Death by Crucifixion #1325

17 And He, bearing His cross, went out to a place called the Place of a Skull, which is called in Hebrew, Golgotha, 18 where they crucified Him, and two others with Him, one on either side, and Jesus in the center. 19 Now Pilate wrote a title and put it on the cross. And the writing was: JESUS OF NAZARETH, THE KING OF THE JEWS. (John 19:17–19, NKJV)

Calvary is the Latinized form of the Place of a Skull, the skull-like hill where Jesus was crucified (Luke 23:33). With criminals hanging on either side, Jesus was nailed to a cross until dead. Crucifixion was execution by torture, a most horrid, gruesome event. (The word excruciating derives from the Latin excruciatus, “from, or out of the cross.”) Nails driven through the hands and feet would damage nerves and send fiery bolts of pain through his limbs. Already severely weakened from being scourged, every breath became increasingly labored and shallow. The weight of his body prevented normal breathing, while every movement caused more shots of agony to course through his body. Soon, dehydration became another factor leading to death. Sometimes legs were broken, quickening death, but in Jesus’ case (John 19:32-33). Finally, exhausted and racked with agony, the body releases its last breath and death comes mercifully (John 19:30). Jesus endured crucifixion so we can be saved. Our sin deserves the eternal agony of hell (Romans 6:23). Jesus died so we can live. No one ever cared for you like Jesus (John 15:13; Romans 5:8; 1 John 3:1). Do you care for him?

“Oh, taste and see that the Lord is good” #1234

8 Oh, taste and see that the Lord is good; Blessed is the man who trusts in Him! 9 Oh, fear the Lord, you His saints! There is no want to those who fear Him. 10 The young lions lack and suffer hunger; But those who seek the Lord shall not lack any good thing. (Psalm 34:8–10, NKJV)

David’s life was in danger. King Saul was pursuing him, and when he fled to Gath of the Philistines, he had to pretend to be insane to escape threats on his life (1 Samuel 21:10-15). When we fall into trials we are tempted to accuse God. How is it that these perils did not shake David’s faith in God? Today’s passage shows us how David’s resolve was strengthened in the face of trials. First, he knew God blesses those who trust in Him (v. 8). David believed God’s word and promises. Trust in God overwhelms trials in this world. Second, David feared God (v. 9). Reverence for God, who provides and protects His people, keeps its focus on God in the day of calamity. Third, David continued to seek the Lord. God’s will and pleasure, not his own, ruled David’s life. Do not allow temptations and trials of life to diminish your faith. Like David, trust God, fear God and seek God. The Lord is good. He will bless and sustain His holy ones, for they rely on Him and see His goodness.

Impartiality #1323

My brethren, do not hold the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord of glory, with partiality.” (James 2:1, NKJV)

Impartiality is a trait of God Himself; “God shows no partiality” (Acts 10:34; Romans 2:11). We must resist and reject the temptation to show favoritism in our judgments and our treatment of others. We cannot hold the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ and do otherwise. Partiality is motivated by appearance, which exposes its unjust nature (John 7:23-24). Partiality grants an undue advantage to one, while unjustly withholding that same advantage from another (see James 2:2-4). Impartiality is a mark of justice, while partiality is unjust. God was quite clear in His law to Israel to be impartial in their treatment of others: “You shall do no injustice in judgment. You shall not be partial to the poor, nor honor the person of the mighty. In righteousness you shall judge your neighbor” (Leviticus 19:15). Did you catch that? Neither poverty, riches, power or nobility were to inform and influence their judgments. Righteousness was to direct their judgments and their treatment of others. Judges were charged not to show partiality in judgment (Deuteronomy 1:17). Showing favoritism and bestowing benefits based on appearance rather than truth is not love for one’s neighbor. When we show partiality in judgment we “become judges with evil thoughts” (James 2:4). Let us be just in all our dealings, without partiality.

The Carnal Mind #1322

For to be carnally minded is death, but to be spiritually minded is life and peace.” (Romans 8:6, NKJV)

The life and peace God grants the spiritually minded is set in sharp contrast to the outcome of being carnally minded. Eternal death is its ultimate reward. Even in this life, the person who lives for the indulgences of the flesh is already spiritually dead (1 Timothy 5:6). Carnality is living by and for the flesh. It is antagonistic to God and His will both in mind and conduct. To be carnally minded not only fails to be spiritual, it produces anti-spiritual behavior. In 1 Corinthians 3:1-2, the apostle said the Corinthians were carnal rather than spiritual because they had not matured in Christ; they were still babes who were not partaking of the solid food of truth. Their carnal thinking produced “envy, strife, and divisions” toward their fellow Christians. By doing so, they had become anti-spiritual. Their display of conflict showed their nature and character was being controlled by the flesh instead of by the Spirit of God (whose fruit is “love, joy and peace,” 1 Corinthians 3:3; Galatians 5:22). Our conduct will show whether our mind is on the flesh, or on the things of the Spirit (1 Corinthians 2:10-16).